Upcoming Courses

Summer 2021 Course Offerings 

Pre-Session (5/17/2021-6/5/2021)

001 Fully Online
Instructor: Lynda Zwinger

So many of us grew up on Disney's version of fairy tales; they are a part of people's childhoods and in fact are enjoyed by people well beyond their early years. Beautiful, witty, and timeless, for many people Disney means fairy tales. But fairy tales are very old forms of narrative entertainment, with some of them harking back to even older forms. And the older versions do not limit themselves to princesses in blue ball gowns and gruff but ultimately good-hearted bad guys. In this section of “Introduction to Fairy Tales,” we will view some of the iconic Disney versions of fairy tales, read the tales on which they are based, and think about what cultural and personal role these apparently deathless tales play, then and now. Work will consist of informal writing assignments and online discussion.

Readings

The required text for this class is an etext:

Maria Tatar (ed.), The Classic Fairy Tales. Norton, 2nd edition.

The URL is: https://www.amazon.com/Classic-Second-Norton-Critical-Editions-ebook/dp/B01NBWHWIN/ref=mt_kindle?_encoding=UTF8&me=&qid=1545059704

001 Fully Online
Instructor: Tenney Nathanson

This is a course in “close reading.” The reading assignments will be short, to allow us to pay close attention to individual texts and individual passages. We’ll read many poems and some short stories, with an eye toward mastering the close reading techniques crucial to the sort of literary analysis we practice in upper-division literature courses (and beyond). For this online course, daily participation in discussion boards will be a major course requirement. Students will also write approximately six short exercises (roughly 1-2 pages each) and two papers (roughly 3-4 pages each). There are no exams.

There’s no booklist for this course. All course materials will be available online.

Questions? Please email the instructor at nathanso@email.arizona.edu

FIVE WEEK FIRST SESSION (06/07/2021-07/08/2021)
110 Fully Online
Instructor: Samiha Matin

Beginning techniques of fiction writing, taught through exercises, the writing of original fiction, and readings in contemporary fiction.

110 Fully Online
Instructor: Kate Bernheimer

“Let it Go” and come learn about fairy tales! What meaning do these beautiful tales of survival hold for you? In this class, we will read multiple variations of classic fairy tales from around the world. We will follow their breadcrumbs from communal storytelling into literary culture and Disney, and from childhood to adulthood. The folkloric writing assignments in this class are designed to spark your curiosity and encourage your confidence. Our resilient guides include Little Red Riding Hood, Donkeyskin, Hansel & Gretel, The Little Mermaid, Elsa & Anna, and others. Prepare to be enchanted. All course materials will be available on D2L, apart from “Frozen,” a movie, which you will need to rent or purchase to watch (even if you have seen it before, you'll need to see it again!).

110/210 Fully Online
Instructor: Julie Christen

Building on the close reading, focused research, and reflective writing done in your general education writing courses (ENGL101 and ENGL102 and their equivalents), this course emphasizes the skills of rhetorical analysis, research, persuasion, reflection, and revision in specific professional and technical contexts. It is designed to help students learn to write for varied audiences and situations, find and evaluate sources, and make critically aware decisions about how best to achieve their purposes. The immediate goal of this course is to prepare students for further research and writing in future professional settings. This course fulfills a core requirement in the undergraduate major and minor in Professional and Technical Writing and in the undergraduate certificate in Professional and Technical Writing.

110 Fully Online
Instructor: Lauren Mason

How have literary expression and our understandings of the self-changed alongside the media technologies of the twenty-first century? This course examines the place of fiction among social media, big data, fan fiction, video games, and the many other forms of entertainment that compete with it today. To do so, we'll learn about the history of media forms, and some of the methods of media studies, which consider how media forms shape the stories they convey. We will read novels, a play, poetry, and experimental forms that ask what technology might be changing about the human condition, including concerns about privacy, identity, politics, memory, and more. Along the way, we will encounter some of the history of experimental literature and we'll consider what forms the future of literary expression will take.

110/210 Fully Online
Instructor: Shelley Rodrigo

Students will explore the theories and practices of professional and academic portfolios while simultaneously designing and developing an adaptive identity and a professional persona for post-graduate settings. Students will synthesize work from past and present courses and experiences. They will make complex composition decisions about content, design, structure, and media of their portfolios in connection with identifiable elements of a given rhetorical situation. Students will discuss and apply legal and ethical issues related to portfolio development and publication of 21st century digital identities. For registration please contact Sharon Meyerson (sharonne@email.arizona.edu).

FIVE WEEK SECOND SESSION (07/12/2021-08/11/2021)
110 Fully Online
Instructor: Hannah Lawless

Beginning techniques of poetry writing, taught through exercises, the writing of original poetry, and readings in contemporary poetry.

111 Fully Online
Instructor: Lynda Zwinger

So many of us grew up on Disney's version of fairy tales; they are a part of people's childhoods and in fact are enjoyed by people well beyond their early years. Beautiful, witty, and timeless, for many people Disney means fairy tales. But fairy tales are very old forms of narrative entertainment, with some of them harking back to even older forms. And the older versions do not limit themselves to princesses in blue ball gowns and gruff but ultimately good-hearted bad guys.  In this section of "Introduction to Fairy Tales," we will view some of the iconic Disney versions of fairy tales, read the tales on which they are based, and think about what cultural and personal role these apparently deathless tales play, then and now. Work will consist of informal writing assignments and online discussion.

Readings

The required text for this class is an etext:

Maria Tatar (ed.), The Classic Fairy Tales. Norton, 2nd edition.

The URL is: https://www.amazon.com/Classic-Second-Norton-Critical-Editions-ebook/dp/B01NBWHWIN/ref=mt_kindle?_encoding=UTF8&me=&qid=1545059704

110 Fully Online
Instructor: Lauren Mason

Close reading of literary texts, critical analysis, and articulation of intellectually challenging ideas in clear prose.

110 Fully Online
Instructor: Peter Figler

English 300 is a comparative study of literature and cinema as aesthetic media. Given the breadth and complexities of film and literature, including historical, technical, and narrative elements, our class will be subdivided into overlapping sections: “Film, Literature, and Aesthetics,” “Adaptation and Intertextuality,” and “Cultural and Ideological Connections.” We will survey a curated list of films and texts that serve as examples, emphasizing specific dimensions that support course outcomes. Class activities include asynchronous discussions, individual reflections, short essays, and a final multimodal project that synthesizes the course modules and materials. Our texts and films are found on D2L, so that they may be easily accessed and revisited as often as needed.

SEVEN WEEK FIRST SESSION (05/17/2021-07/02/2021)
101/201 Fully Online
Instructor: Dennis Wise

Monsters are cool—but they’re also interesting, and also sometimes deeply problematic. The category of the “non-human” (or, more broadly, “the Other”) raises key questions about human identity, human values, and the boundaries we construct to cordon off the horrific, the weird, the frightening, the monstrous, or the non-human. Imaginary figures like ghosts, aliens, or monsters confirm—or challenge—those boundaries that peoples and cultures create. As a result, we won’t focus simply on a particular creature-types like zombies, vampires, or cyborgs. Instead, by examining selected literary texts and films, we’ll look at the monster-figure as a key indicator of cultural history—the symbolic carrier of cultural values and problems. These cultural values can include things like political tensions, systems of religious belief, human nature, cultural conflict, social order and disorder, or distinctions of race/class/gender. As we’ll see, monsters often become symbols in the cultural, political, and intellectual clashes that mark Western history. In order to better understand our cultural roots, then, we’ll have to come to terms with the historical and ideological tensions behind those clashes, which we’ll demonstrate in class through well-organized analytical arguments that present strong textual evidence and display critical thinking.

101 Fully Online
Instructor: Nina Conrad

An English grammar and editing course in which students will learn and apply contextual strategies for editing their own writing, as well as the writing of others, for grammar, style, and format.

101 Fully Online
Instructor: Kate Bernheimer

“Let it Go” and come learn about fairy tales! What meaning do these beautiful tales of survival hold for you? In this class, we will read multiple variations of classic fairy tales from around the world. We will follow their breadcrumbs from communal storytelling into literary culture and Disney, and from childhood to adulthood. The folkloric writing assignments in this class are designed to spark your curiosity and encourage your confidence. Our resilient guides include Little Red Riding Hood, Donkeyskin, Hansel & Gretel, The Little Mermaid, Elsa & Anna, and others. Prepare to be enchanted. All course materials will be available on D2L, apart from “Frozen,” a movie, which you will need to rent or purchase to watch (even if you have seen it before, you'll need to see it again!).

101 Fully Online
Instructor: Matthew Abraham

This course will explore the emerging genre of autobiography associated with explorations of populist anger, racial division, political resentment, sexual desire, familial and non-familial connections, and personal growth. We will read the following fictional and non-fictional works: Kiese Laymon’s Heavy: An American Memoir, Claire Dederer’s Love and Trouble: A Midlife Reckoning, Jeanine Cummins’ American Dirt, and Khaled Hosseini’s Kite Runnner. The course will introduce students to how the autobiographical genre, which can also emerge in fiction, creates conceptions of agency and personhood, in various life contexts. I am fully cognizant of the publication controversy around Cummins’ American Dirt: A Novel but hope we can use the controversy to learn something about the genres Cummins engages in the book. Students will write two short course papers during the summer session, in addition to writing D2L discussion posts in response to instructor and classmate prompts.

 

101 Fully Online
Instructor: Ted McLoof
This is a Writing Emphasis Course for the Creative Writing Major. Discussion of student stories in a workshop setting.

SEVEN WEEK SECOND SESSION (07/06/2021-08/20/2021)

101 Fully Online
Instructor: Sarah Bates

This course is intended to give students a practical understanding of beginning techniques of nonfiction writing, taught through exercises, the writing of original nonfiction, and readings in contemporary nonfiction.  The course complements existing courses in poetry (ENGL209) and fiction (ENGL210).  All three courses are intended to improve undergraduate education by providing contact hours with Creative Writing faculty members early in the undergraduate's course of study.

101 Fully Online
Instructor: Eguono Edafioka

Beginning techniques of fiction writing, taught through exercises, the writing of original fiction, and readings in contemporary fiction.

101 Fully Online
Instructor: Lynda Zwinger

So many of us grew up on Disney's version of fairy tales; they are a part of people's childhoods and in fact are enjoyed by people well beyond their early years. Beautiful, witty, and timeless, for many people Disney means fairy tales. But fairy tales are very old forms of narrative entertainment, with some of them harking back to even older forms. And the older versions do not limit themselves to princesses in blue ball gowns and gruff but ultimately good-hearted bad guys.  In this section of "Introduction to Fairy Tales," we will view some of the iconic Disney versions of fairy tales, read the tales on which they are based, and think about what cultural and personal role these apparently deathless tales play, then and now. Work will consist of informal writing assignments and online discussion.

Readings

The required text for this class is an etext:

Maria Tatar (ed.), The Classic Fairy Tales. Norton, 2nd edition.

The URL is: https://www.amazon.com/Classic-Second-Norton-Critical-Editions-ebook/dp/B01NBWHWIN/ref=mt_kindle?_encoding=UTF8&me=&qid=1545059704

101 Fully Online
Instructor: Stephanie Pearmain

From the “origins” of the Children’s Literature to the current day call for diverse voices in the genre, this course examines the development of concepts of the child, children’s literature, and Western Culture. We will read a broad spectrum of historical and contemporary U.S., British, and world literature, and works representing a variety of genres and cultures. Through a survey of folk tales, picture books, middle grade novels, and young adult novels we will consider the historical development of children’s literature as well as its dual agenda of instruction and amusement.

101 Fully Online
Instructor: Maritza Cardenas

What can the study of popular cultural forms like Television, Films, Advertisements, Video Games, Facebook as well as cultural practices like shopping, viewing habits, and other modes of consumption reveal about US American Values? How do representations of race, class, gender, and sexuality disseminated within these popular texts shape the way we come to see others and ourselves? These are some of the guiding questions we will be exploring in our study of US popular culture. Through an examination of both critical essays and primary texts, students in this course will learn not only how to critically read and interpret various cultural forms, but also will come to understand the ways in which popular culture structures our day to day lives.

101 Fully Online
Instructor: Mary Rosenberry

In this course we’ll study environmental literature and cinema as aesthetic media. Over a period of five weeks, we’ll consider the ways that particular landscapes and environment in general are portrayed in literature and film that we typically think of as “fiction” (novels and Hollywood blockbusters) as well as literature and film that we tend to think of as “nonfiction” (memoirs, documentaries, etc). We’ll focus on landscapes and spaces that have been foundational throughout both history and literature: forests, farms, and frozen “wastelands.” 

110/210 Fully Online

Instructor: Julie Christen

This seven-week, asynchronous online course introduces the theory and practice of professional and technical writing in academic, professional, and community contexts. Using open educational resources and library-accessible resources, we will learn about key concepts, values, practices, and areas of expertise. We will apply our learning in a course project that examines and reports on professional and technical writing in specific contexts chosen by students. This course fulfills a core course requirement for the undergraduate major and minor in Professional and Technical Writing.

101 Fully Online
Instructor: Christine Tardy

Sociolinguistics is the study of language in society, including how language varies across social contexts and users. It is relevant to everyone, because we all use language--though we may not always be aware of the ways language impacts how we perceive other people and how they perceive us. In this survey course, we will study several major topics and concepts in sociolinguistics, including language variation in social groups (especially related to gender, age, ethnicity, race, and social class), language variation in social contexts (with an emphasis on discourse analysis and conversation analysis), and English in a global context.

101 Fully Online
Instructor: Tenney Nathanson

American poets were instrumental in shaping the movement known as modernism.  Stressing experiment and innovation, their work challenged conventional conceptions of poetry, creating a hyper-textual space in which competing idioms, discourses, and models of social and political action could jostle freely.  (Contemporary poetry, especially so-called “composition by field,” is very much an outgrowth of modernist practice.)  We will focus on the work of Eliot, Pound, Williams, H.D., Stevens, Moore, and selected African American poets of the period: possibly McKay, Toomer, Cullen, Brown, Hughes, Tolson, Hayden, Walker, Brooks.  We will stress close reading of individual poems but will also explore modernism as a program of literary and cultural innovation.

Fall 2021 Classes 

Looking for a class in Fall 2021? Check out our great line up of literature, language, and writing courses to help round out your gen-eds, major requirements, or electives.

Visit the Schedule of Classes to find days/time for courses. Then register in the UAccess Student Center.

Schedule of Classes    UAccess Student Center

English 100 & 200 Level Courses

    101 Fully Online
    7 Week Second Session
    Instructor: Matthew Abraham
    As a nation we seem more divided than ever. Anger, resentment, and calls for resistance against various cultural forces have been especially prominent since January of 2017. Add to this situation a pandemic, which is straining the infrastructural resources of every country in the world, and one can understand how the phrase “world on fire” applies (See Amy Chua’s World on Fire: How Exporting Free Market Democracy Breeds Ethnic Hatred and Global Instability. Anchor Books, 2004.) In this context, expressions of racism, misogyny, xenophobia toward immigrants, and general disgust directed toward those who look or behave differently become manifest. Unemployment, social marginalization, and a rapid increase in substance abuse and suicide among middle-aged men represent a societal tipping point.
    The rise of the Black Lives Matter Movement, #MeToo, and immigrant activism point to a widespread recognition of how systemic abuses of power are being resisted strongly by certain demographic sectors. At the center of this storm of protest and resistance is the presidency of Donald J. Trump, whose unprecedented campaign and election fueled the rise of large-scale resistance movements among women, ethnic minorities, environmentalists, and ordinary citizens intent on defending constitutional norms and mainstream governmental institutions. At the same time, we must recognize a backlash against these movements represented by the rise of white supremacy and white nationalism.
    In this course, we will explore the role of anger and resentment in the context of understanding this current historical and political movement that has made resistance fashionable again. How are anger and resentment mobilized to create coalitions around key social issues such as feminism (#MeToo), the Black Lives Matter Movement, immigration, as well as among those who constitute a general opposition to current policies on many fronts including healthcare, education, and corporate control of worker rights? How might we go about thinking about and discussing these oppositional movements that have tapped into widespread anger and disappointment in the state of American democracy? How have other oppositional movements, such as those expressing nativist and racial supremacist sentiments, channeled their anger and resentment in the age of Trump through social media?  These are just some of the questions that we will turn to in this seven-and-a-half-week course.
    Possible Course Texts (available at U of A Bookstore or at an online bookstore):
    Anne Case and Angus Deaton. Deaths of Despair and the Future of Capitalism.
    Princeton UP, 2020.
    Metzel, Jonathan. Dying of Whiteness: How the Politics of Racial Resentment is Killing America’s
    Heartland. Basic Books, 2019.
    Katherine Stewart. The Power Worshippers: Inside the Dangerous Rise of
    Religious Nationalism. Bloomsbury, 2020.
    Lawrence Wright’s The End of October: A Novel. Knopf, 2020.
     

    001 In Person

    M/W 5:00-6:15 PM

    Instructor: Staff

     

    002 In Person

    T/Th 3:30-4:45 PM

    Instructor: Staff

     

    003 In Person

    M/W 3:30-4:45 PM

    Instructor: Staff

    Students will gain a working knowledge of these concepts and terms: memoir, personal essay, portrait, travel essay, literary journalism, narrative voice, dialogue, metaphor, image, scene, narrative summary, reflection, and research. Students will read selected texts and discuss craft elements in works of literary nonfiction. Students will develop writing skills by doing exercises and writing assignments in several modes of nonfiction writing (i.e., portrait, travel essay, memoir).

     

     

    001 In Person

    T/Th 11:00 AM-12:15 PM

    Instructor: Staff

     

    002 In Person

    T/Th 2:00 -3:15 PM

    Instructor: Staff

     

    003 In Person

    M/W 3:30-4:45 PM

    Instructor: Staff

    The beginning course in the undergraduate poetry-writing sequence. Method of instruction: class discussion of student poems, with some readings of modern and contemporary poetry. Workshop sections are limited to 20 students. Priority enrollment given to Creative Writing majors and minors.

    001 In Person
    T/Th 9:30-10:45 AM
    Instructor: Staff
    The 200-level course introduces the student to craft terms and concepts through lecture, exercises, and reading selections. The workshop method introduces the sharing and critique of original student work in breakout discussion groups. Students gain a working knowledge of basic craft terms and concepts such as character, plot, setting, narrative time, dialogue, point-of-view, voice, conflict resolution, and metaphorical language. The group will analyze readings from published authors are analyzed from a writer’s perspective. Students will identify and hone the writing skills necessary for success in fiction writing. Students complete exercises based on these elements and write at least one complete short story.
     
    002 In Person
    M/W 5:00-6:15 PM
    Instructor: Staff
     
    003 In Person
    T/Th 5:00-6:15 PM
    Instructor: Staff
     
    004 In Person
    F 9:30 AM-12:00 PM
    Instructor: Staff
     
    005 In Person
    F 12:30-3:00 PM
    Instructor: Staff
    The 200-level course introduces the student to craft terms and concepts through lecture, exercises, and reading selections. The workshop method introduces the sharing and critique of original student work in breakout discussion groups. Students gain a working knowledge of basic craft terms and concepts such as character, plot, setting, narrative time, dialogue, point-of-view, voice, conflict resolution, and metaphorical language. The group will analyze readings from published authors are analyzed from a writer’s perspective. Students will identify and hone the writing skills necessary for success in fiction writing. Students complete exercises based on these elements and write at least one complete short story.
     
    001 In Person
    Instructor: Bojan Louis
    This discussion and reading based course will introduce students of creative writing to the most important terms and concepts utilized across the three genres taught at the University of Arizona: poetry, creative nonfiction and fiction. While we will spend the majority of our time reading, analyzing (from the perspective of craft) and discussing published work across a variety of time periods and literary styles, students will also have a chance to experiment in their own writing with some of the tools and approaches highlighted throughout our readings and across the three genres. Visiting guest authors may also join us for some of our class time. 
     
    101 Fully Online
    7 Week First Session
    Instructor: Kate Bernheimer
    “Let it Go” and come learn about fairy tales! What meaning do these beautiful tales of survival hold for you? In this class, we will read multiple variations of classic fairy tales from around the world. We will follow their breadcrumbs from communal storytelling into literary culture and Disney, and from childhood to adulthood. The folkloric writing assignments in this class are designed to spark your curiosity and encourage your confidence. Our resilient guides include Little Red Riding Hood, Donkeyskin, Hansel & Gretel, The Little Mermaid, Elsa & Anna, and others. Prepare to be enchanted. All course materials will be available on D2L, apart from “Frozen,” a movie, which you will need to rent or purchase to watch (even if you have seen it before, you'll need to see it again!).
    101 Fully Online
    7 Week First Session
    Instructor: Stephanie Pearmain
    From the “origins” of Children’s Literature to the current day call for diverse voices in the genre, this course examines the development of concepts of the child, children’s literature, and Western Culture. We will read a broad spectrum of historical and contemporary U.S., British, and world literature, and works representing a variety of genres and cultures. Through a survey of folk tales, picture books, middle grade novels, young adult novels, and graphic novels, we will consider the historical development of children’s literature as well as its dual agenda of instruction and amusement.
     
    101 Fully Online
    7 Week First Session
    Instructor: Maritza Cardenas
    What can the study of popular cultural forms like Television, Films, Advertisements, Video Games, Facebook as well as cultural practices like shopping, viewing habits, and other modes of consumption reveal about US American Values? How do representations of race, class, gender, and sexuality disseminated within these popular texts shape the way we come to see others and ourselves? These are some of the guiding questions we will be exploring in our study of U.S. popular culture. Through an examination of both critical essays and primary texts, students in this course will learn not only how to critically read and interpret various cultural forms, but also will come to understand the ways in which popular culture structures our day to day lives.
     
    110 Fully Online
    7 Week Second Session
    Instructor: Maritza Cardenas
    What can the study of popular cultural forms like Television, Films, Advertisements, Video Games, Facebook as well as cultural practices like shopping, viewing habits, and other modes of consumption reveal about US American Values? How do representations of race, class, gender, and sexuality disseminated within these popular texts shape the way we come to see others and ourselves? These are some of the guiding questions we will be exploring in our study of U.S. popular culture. Through an examination of both critical essays and primary texts, students in this course will learn not only how to critically read and interpret various cultural forms, but also will come to understand the ways in which popular culture structures our day to day lives.
     
    001 In Person
    T/Th 5:00-6:15 PM
    Instructor: Staff
     
    002 In Person
    T/Th 12:30-1:45 PM
    Instructor: Staff
    Close reading of literary texts, critical analysis, and articulation of intellectually challenging ideas in clear prose.
     
    003 Live Online
    T/Th 2:00-3:15 PM
    Instructor: Daniel Cooper Alarcón
    For these sections of English 280, we will read a wide-range of different types of literature: short stories, poems, plays, novels—as well as some texts that are not so easy to classify. We will discuss the challenges that each of these different literary forms present to us as readers, as we try to interpret and make sense of them. Over the course of the semester, we will discuss the varied elements that comprise literary works, the varied aspects that one might consider when analyzing a literary text and different interpretive approaches to literature. We will also discuss literary tradition and why it matters when thinking about individual texts. For the reading list, I am selecting texts that are not only moving and meaningful, but also creative and inventive; texts that not only offer us insight into the world and its endlessly varied communities and human relationships, but also that amplify our understanding of literature and what it can do. The reading list for the course will likely include short stories and memoirs by Bret Harte, Jack London, Ernest Hemingway, John Steinbeck, Paul Bowles, Leslie Marmon Silko, Clarice Lispector, and Rosario Ferré; the play “Zoot Suit,” by Luis Valdez, Volkswagen Blues (a delightful road trip novel), Jamaica Kincaid’s A Small Place, poems by Martin Espada, and Art Spiegelman’s Pulitzer prize-winning, graphic memoir about the Holocaust, Maus. Expect to write several short papers over the course of the semester.

    English 300 & 400 Level Courses

    001 In Person
    T/Th 11:00 AM-12:15 PM
    Instructor: Christopher Cokinos
    This is an intermediate workshop in creative nonfiction. You'll have a required text and will help “curate” the reading list from online sources! You will write one Brevity-type essay (750 words) and one Object Lessons/The Atlantic Online essay (1,000 words), plus a third essay of any kind or length (at least 1,000 words). You will revise all three for a final portfolio.
    Subject matter is wide open. We are here to evaluate language and writerly possibilities not judge lives. This workshop is a safe space, multivocal and, while necessarily focused on critical takes about your essays, it will be supportive. As well, should a larger contextual discussion about what informs an essay’s standpoint be necessary, we won’t shy from that. The phrases constructive criticism and compassionate reflection come to mind.
    The course mixes workshops, in-class writing, discussions and more. The vibe is energetic and helpful.
    001 In Person
    T/Th 12:30-1:45 PM
    Instructor: Staff
     
    002 In Person
    F 12:30-3:00 PM
    Instructor: Staff
    Practice in writing short fiction.
     
    001 In Person
    M/W 3:30-4:45 PM
    Instructor: Farid Matuk
    Our class time will mostly be divided between close reading seminars where we read contemporary poets and studio time in which we draft out of a range of prompts and exercises. We will transition to whole-group critiques when appropriate. While this course is about writing better poems, it is ultimately about learning new ways of seeing, feeling, thinking, and being; it’s about expanding your took kit for self-invention and for world-invention.
    001 Live Online
    T/Th 2:00-3:15 PM
    Instructor: Christopher Cokinos
    We live in a science-fictional world, with instant communications around the planet, researchers growing meat in labs, spaceships traveling the solar system and a climate that is altering life on the Earth. How did we get here? This course will be a history of the science-fiction short story, with a focus on its modern origins with H.G. Wells, in particular, and moving into some of the "classic" Golden Age work of the mid-20th century, the experimental work of the 1960s--all the way up to the present. The field is almost insanely large, so we can only read a portion of what is available to us. We'll endeavor to analyze texts that conform to traditional science-fiction reader expectations (ideas, a sense of wonder, world-building) and those that are more literary (complex characterization, experiments with style). As the genre expanded, so too did the voices, so we will read such figures in the canon as Clifford Simak and J.G. Ballard and see how SF has been embraced by women and queer writers and those of color, including Ursula LeGuin, Samuel Delaney, Ted Chiang, Octavia Butler and others. There will be two tests, some reading responses on D2L and a final paper. The genre is exciting--even if you are new to it!
    001 In Person
    T/Th 9:30-10:45 AM
    Instructor: Scott Selisker
    What can we learn for our own future from a century's worth of aliens, robots, and star wars? How does science fiction help us to think about the differences between others and ourselves? This course looks at science fiction through a history including the early pulp magazines, the golden age, the new wave, cyberpunk, and contemporary U.S. and global works. We'll explore science fiction’s big questions and aesthetic techniques, mostly through stories but also in film, digital media, fan universes, and at least one novel. Likely authors include Isaac Asimov, Ray Bradbury, Ursula K. Le Guin, Philip K. Dick, Neal Stephenson, Octavia Butler, Ted Chiang, Rebecca Roanhorse, Nnedi Okorafor, Kazuo Ishiguro, Cixin Liu. Requirements include regular short reading response papers, two essays, an individual or group creative project, active participation in class discussion and group activities, and a take-home final exam.
    001 In Person
    T/Th 12:30-1:45 PM
    Instructor: Scott Selisker
    How have literary expression and our understandings of the self changed alongside the media technologies of the twenty-first century? This course examines the place of fiction among social media, big data, fan fiction, video games, and the many other forms of entertainment that compete with it today. To do so, we’ll learn about the history of media forms, and some of the methods of media studies, which consider how media forms shape the stories they convey. We will read novels, a play, poetry, and experimental forms that ask what technology might be changing about the human condition, including concerns about privacy, identity, politics, memory, and more. Along the way, we will encounter some of the history of experimental literature and we’ll consider what forms the future of literary expression might take. Likely authors include Samuel Beckett, Walter Benjamin, Marshall McLuhan, David Foster Wallace, Jennifer Egan, G Willow Wilson, Ted Chiang, N. Katherine Hayles, Lisa Nakamura, Jia Tolentino. Requirements include regular short reading response papers, two essays, an individual or group presentation, active participation in class discussion and group activities, and a take-home final exam.
     
    001 In Person
    M/W 11:00 AM-12:15 PM
    Instructor: Ragini Tharoor Srinivasan
    Do literary texts have accents, the way people do? How do we read the accented voices of English? This class explores voice and accent in English literature and cultural production, including podcasts, audiobooks, film, and television. Everyone has an accent, but not all accents are created equal. Some are heard as “neutral” and others as markers of difference. This has serious implications in the real world: accent discrimination costs jobs, housing applications, and asylum claims. What are the implications in the field of multiethnic literature? Students will examine ethnic American literatures alongside interdisciplinary scholarship on topics including race and voice (e.g. brown voice, white voice, “Mock Asian,” Black English), the cybernetic voices of virtual assistants like Siri, forensic listening, and call centers. Students will gain broad understanding of politics of literary voice and accent, while learning to use their own accented voices to produce close, critical readings and informed social interventions.
    001 In Person
    M/W 12:30-1:45 PM
    Instructor: Matthew Abraham
    While the art of rhetoric is often thought about in relation to persuasion and to a host of classical figures such as Plato, Aristotle, Quintilian, Cicero, and the Sophists, it provides a much larger framework that helps us to explain and understand modern social phenomena such as the concepts of “post-truth” and “fake news” in modern culture, as well as the rise of demagogic and authoritarian figures in the context of populist political movements. For example, we see how prevalent references to “fake news” and “post-truth” have become in media discourse, where even science and objectivity have been called into question because of their connections to power and corruption. In this context, one gets to choose literally what she or he would like to believe about the external world because there is probably a community out there that will support it. What problems are posed for public discourse and deliberation when questions about representation become so prevalent? This is a major question we will consider in this class.
    By examining rhetorical traditions, we will lay the ground to understand how language and rhetoric have been used and abused by those in power. By understanding how rhetoric has developed throughout history as a tool of persuasion and manipulation, we will develop a greater appreciation of how the use of language in various contexts shapes our framing of reality. This is especially important as we enter what has been labeled as a “post-truth” era, where the very ability to represent “facts” and “reality” have been called into question.
    Whether you are interested in the representation and treatment of minorities and women under the Trump administration, have an abiding interest in the rapid growth and influence of social movements such as #MeToo or Black Lives Matter, or have wondered why our current political moment is so unbelievable, you will be able to see the applicability of rhetoric to the emergence of social concerns and the growth of social movements in the public sphere.
    001 In Person
    T/Th 9:30-10:45AM
    Instructor: Staff
    A survey of British and American literature to 1660, with emphasis on major writers in their literary and historical contexts.
     
    001 In Person
    M/W 10:00-10:50 AM | Discussion Sections: 001A: F; 10:00-10:50 | 001B: F; 11:00-11:50
    Instructor: Paul Hurh
    A survey of literature written in English in Britain and America from the 17th through the 19th centuries, this course will read broadly through multiple significant historical traditions, including but not limited to: Restoration comedy, Puritan poetry, American autobiography, Romanticism, the novel of manners, the gothic romance, the slave narrative, and periodical fiction.  Students will leave the course having read several of the most studied and referenced works of the period, and will be able to explain the significance of those works as both individual works of literature and in relation to the wider development of historical literary traditions.
    ENGL 380 Literary Analysis: The Rural and the Pastoral
    001 In Person
    M/W 11:00 AM-12:15 PM
    Instructor: Tenney Nathanson
    This is a course in “close reading.” The reading assignments will be short, to allow us to pay close attention to individual texts and individual passages. We’ll read many poems some short stories, and perhaps one novel, with an eye toward mastering the close reading techniques crucial to the sort of literary analysis we practice in upper-division literature courses (and beyond). For this live online course, regular attendance at Zoom classes and regular participation in online discussion boards are required. Students will write roughly 7-8 short papers (1-2 pp. each), and 2 slightly longer papers (3-5 pp. each). There are no exams.
    Questions? Please email the instructor at nathanso@arizona.edu
     
    ENGL 380 Literary Analysis
    002 Live Online
    M/W 12:30-1:45 PM
    Instructor: Manya Lempert
    English 380 teaches the art of “close reading,” a foundational approach to interpreting literature. Close reading involves careful attention to the words on the page. One question that close reading answers is: “how do these words convey meanings that different words wouldn’t?” Close reading leads us to consider all aspects of style and their effects on content. As we learn to close read, we will focus on works of science fiction from the last 150 years. Science fiction will bring us into contact with “weird” tales, horror, fantasy, magical realism, and post-apocalyptic and dystopian literature. We will analyze poems, plays, short stories, and novels, delving into questions of technology and human connection, as well as social, economic, and environmental crisis.
     
    ENGL 380 Literary Analysis
    003 In Person
    M/W 2:00-3:15 PM
    Instructor: Marcia Klotz
    Introduction to the various modes, techniques, and terminology of practical criticism.
     
    001 In Person
    M/W 2:00-3:15 PM
    Instructor: Ragini Tharoor Srinivasan
    This junior seminar engages contemporary Asian Anglophone literatures in the exploration of the emergence of an economically, politically, and culturally dominant Asia in the 21st century. Today, signs of Asian globality and growth abound: from the spectacle of the Beijing Olympics, to the multiplication of Indian billionaires; from the linguistic politics of the Filipino call center, to the dissemination of Japanese pop culture; from the oscillating rhetorics of American decline and exceptionalism, to the material consequences of the U.S.-China trade war. Is the Asian century a rhetorical provocation or an empirical description of the contemporary world—or both, or neither? This course takes up that question by positing “the Asian 21st century” as both a literary theme and period. In what ways does the Asian 21st century describe our current cultural and geopolitical moment? How are contemporary Asian Anglophone, Asian American, and American literatures writing the Asian century?
    We will read novels, short stories, nonfiction, and poetry along with relevant social and cultural theory that explores the Asian century discourse. Subtopics will include the waning of Euro-American hegemony, diasporic return to global Asia, new regional alignments after September 11th, the COVID-19 pandemic, and the contemporary itself. Course texts may include literature by Aravind Adiga, Minal Hajratwala, Mohsin Hamid, Amitava Kumar, Chang-rae Lee, Sonny Liew, Ling Ma, Viet Thanh Nguyen, and Ruth Ozeki as well as a works of journalistic reportage, philosophy, and literary criticism.
     
    002 In Person
    TR 3:30-4:45 PM
    Instructor: Staff
    This junior-level proseminar introduces students to methods and materials of literary research.  Content of individual seminars will vary, based upon instructor.
     
    001 In Person
    Th 3:30-6:00 PM
    Instructor: Ander Monson
    This is the advanced workshop in nonfiction which, we should start by admitting, isn’t a genre. Nonfiction is just a descriptor, and not a very good one, since intelligent people don’t entirely agree about what it describes and what rules of engagement practitioners and readers expect. Instead we often use the term creative nonfiction (a little better) or (even better to my ear) literary nonfiction, which at least properly owns its snobbery. And why not be a little snobby? After all, what we’re interested in is nonfiction writing that aspires to art and complexity and is serious about its craft.
    More often than not we’ll be talking about the essay, which is both a sort of writing as well as a way of thinking and of being, even. Essaying is a way of engaging with the world. Essay, as you probably know, comes from the French, meaning to try, to attempt. That is, what we’re doing is inherently experimental: we’re trying something. Well, why should that surprise us? The history of literature is the history of experimental literature.
    This workshop will be partly generative, especially in the first few weeks, after which most of our time will focus on your own works in progress. We’ll discuss your work—its best qualities, its shapes and possible shapes, its subjects, its moves, its material, its methodology, and directions for improvement and expansion—as a group. We do this not just to improve the work on the table in front of us, but as a way of talking about what we’re working on ourselves. So when we’re workshopping an essay on sea turtles or lobotomies or doll parts or goth songs or Final Fantasy XII by someone, we are always talking about your work. It is often easier to clearly see and talk about others’ work than our own.
    The other thing we’ll be focusing on is research, which is a primary skill for the nonfiction writer. Though we can write about ourselves, we’re not always that interesting (we become a lot more interesting by having something besides ourselves to explore and engage with). And we only find out what we think by researching and writing about the world and its details.
    001 In Person
    T 3:30-6:00 PM
    Instructor: Manuel Muñoz
    This is a Writing Emphasis Course for the Creative Writing Major. Discussion of student stories in a workshop setting.
     
    002 In Person
    F 9:30 AM-12:00 PM
    Instructor: Staff
    This is a Writing Emphasis Course for the Creative Writing Major. Discussion of student stories in a workshop setting.
    001 In Person
    Th 3:30-6:00 PM
    Instructor: Susan Briante
    In this advanced poetry workshop we will hone our skills as writers, readers, and editors of poetry. Weekly exercises will offer a place to experiment with new material, perspectives, and poetic tools. In addition, students will share drafts of their poems with the workshop in order to receive valuable feedback and suggestions for how to improve their work. Finally, we will read a broad range of poetry and poetic statements by contemporary poets as a way to deepen our discussions. The course will culminate with the presentation of a final portfolio and poetics statement.
    001 In Person
    M/W 9:30-10:45 AM
    Instructor: Jennifer Jenkins
    We will explore the greater US Southwest/Borderlands as image, motif, and location in oral narrative and texts, in still and moving images, and in material culture from 1000 BCE to the present. We will examine how understandings of place shape identity through depictions of the land; social and cultural deserts and borders; boom/bust cycles; the mirage of the “land of enchantment;” and representations of indigenous and insurgent cultures. The class will take advantage of the rich array of primary sources available in local archaeological and historical sites, archives, and repositories, and explore literary geography as both concept and digital expression. Students will choose a research topic for the semester in consultation with me. Undergraduate writing requirements: abstract; research bibliography; substantive critical essay or creative-critical project. Graduate writing requirements: abstract; research bibliography; lit review; all leading to a conference presentation or journal article draft. Viewing, reading and research time are considered homework and are the student’s responsibility. 
    Pandemic permitting, there will also be four “field trips”: off-campus visits to Casa Grande National Monument and Mission San Xavier del Bac; and on-campus visits to the Arizona State Museum and UA Special Collections. 
     
    001 In Person
    T/Th 2:00-3:15 PM
    Instructor: Fred Kiefer
    During the first half of his career, Shakespeare wrote most of his romantic comedies, most of his history plays, and several of his best tragedies, including Romeo and Juliet and Hamlet. We shall read a selection of these plays, paying close attention to language, character, and dramatic action. We shall also endeavor to keep in mind that Shakespeare was himself an actor and that his plays came to life on a stage. We will demystify the plays and make them accessible to modern readers. Two exams during the course, a final, and a term paper.
     
    001 In Person
    T/Th 11:00 AM-12:15 PM
    Instructor: Fred Kiefer
    During the second half of his career, Shakespeare wrote most of his great tragedies, his so-called dark comedies, and his late romances. We will read plays from each of these groups, including Othello, King Lear, Antony and Cleopatra, The Winter's Tale, and The Tempest. We will demystify the plays and make them accessible to modern readers. Two exams during the course, a final, and a term paper.
    101 Fully Online
    Instructor: Staff
    A general overview of the profession covering prominent theories, methodologies, and procedures influencing the field.
     
    101 Fully Online
    Instructor: Damián Baca
    Indigenous sign-systems such as pictographs and ideographs are not cemented in some antiquated, obscure past. Non-alphabetic signs and symbols have always been living, fluid signifiers, responsive to diverse contexts and continuously adapting within and beyond logo-syllabic, alphabetic horizons of written communication. This course will provide a foundation for analyzing what self-proclaimed experts of writing so often fail to decipher: how Indigenous Mexican communities continue to create and circulate non-alphabetic inscriptions that are tied to the Valley of Mexico, greater Mexico, México Ocupado, and the México/U.S. borderlands. Specifically, we will analyze how Indigenous signs and Mexican American symbols subvert and revise conventional Colonial Settler taxonomies of writing/art, annotation/illustration, poetry/prose, sacred/profane, so-called visual/multimodal literacies and writing in digital environments. 
    001H In Person
    M/W 12:30-1:45 PM
    Instructor: Paul Hurh
    This seminar will attend to the question of “what can you do with an English major?” by shifting the question to “why does the world need English majors today?” Debates over the value of the liberal arts education have been around almost as long as the study of liberal arts. How is this world made better by young people studying literary works of the past?  Given the shift towards assessable learning outcomes, and a decline in the amount of literary reading and study in high school and foundations curriculums, the question seems more pertinent now than ever. This seminar will prepare its students to be able to articulate, for audiences who may not be English majors themselves, what the value of literary study is, and why the most recent trends in literary scholarship bear on the shared challenges of the post-COVID future.
    As a class, the only required reading will be Moby-Dick and Billy Budd—two works by Herman Melville that deal directly with the challenges, pleasures, values, potentials, and dangers of interpretive practice. Students will also read and stay current with the most recent questions and developments in the “defense of the humanities” and “changes to higher education” pieces in newspapers, magazines, journals, and the twitter-sphere.
    Written assignments, which will undergo extensive revision and workshopping according to the Calderwood Seminar format, will summarize recent articles on the student’s chosen author, orienting the conclusions of literary study outwards towards recognizable “big” problems currently. Those questions may include—media and misinformation, ecology and climate change, race and law, democracy and polarization, technology and feeling, class and labor, among others.
    001 In Person
    M/W 2:00-3:15 PM
    Instructor: Tenney Nathanson
    Modern and contemporary American poets may well be belated romantics; our nineteenth-century romantic precursors may have defined the terms and voiced the ambitions that shape the poetry being written even today. Should we read modern and contemporary American poetry as a continuing celebration--however revisionary--of romantic origins? In English 488A we will explore these issues through sustained reading of the major American romantic poets--Whitman and Dickinson—looking as well at Poe’s ambitious and strange poetry and Emerson’s influential essays. We’ll be concerned with notions of word magic, Adamic language, and language’s supposed cosmogonic power, as well as with the skeptical interrogation of these categories.  As time allows, we may also consider some of the following works: traditional Native American ritual materials; seventeenth century Anglo-American poetry (Taylor, Bradstreet); “non-canonical” nineteenth century poetries; transitional figures such as E. A. Robinson and Trumbull Stickney; early modernist poetry. Principal requirements: three short papers (3-5 pp. each), or two short papers plus a journal of imitations; a final exam.
     
    ENGL 496A Studies in Authors, Periods, Genres and Themes
    001 In Person
    T/Th 12:30-1:45 PM
    Instructor: Staff
    The development and exchange of scholarly information, usually in a small group setting. The scope of work shall consist of research by course registrants, with the exchange of the results of such research through discussion, reports, and/or papers.
     
    ENGL 496A Studies in Authors, Periods, Genres and Themes
    002 In Person
    M/W 12:30-1:45 PM
    Instructor: Staff
    The development and exchange of scholarly information, usually in a small group setting. The scope of work shall consist of research by course registrants, with the exchange of the results of such research through discussion, reports, and/or papers.
     
    ENGL 496A The Hurricane Does Not Roar in Pentameters: Contemporary Caribbean Writers
    003/004 Honors Section, In Person
    M/W 12:30-1:45 PM
    Instructor: Stephanie Brown
    When the Bajan poet and theorist Kamau Brathwaite notes that “The hurricane does not roar in pentameters,” he lays claim to a unique formal inheritance for writers in the Caribbean: that the history, geography, and geology of the Caribbean tasks the artist with innovating to meet the demands of representing what he elsewhere calls the submarine unity of this region. This class will examine how writers in the Caribbean from the mid-twentieth century through the present have risen to this challenge, formally innovating beyond the boundaries of English-language literary traditions. Specifically, we will focus primarily on writers who confront the entanglement of memory, history, and community in the Caribbean context. These authors will include poets (some possibilities: Brathwaite, Derek Walcott, Lorna Goodison, Richard Georges, Fred D’Aguiar), fiction writers (possibilities: David Dabydeen, Paule Marshall, Jean Rhys, Marcia Douglas, Dionne Brand, Kwame Dawes), and essayists (possibilities: Jamaica Kincaid, the writers doing excellent work at the new lit journal Pree). We’ll supplement our reading of creative texts with theory and criticism that explores the implications of this work for literary cultures in the Caribbean and the wider Anglophone world today.  
    Note: Enrollment in this section is limited to students in the English Honors Program. 

    Professional & Technical Writing Courses

    101/201 Fully Online
    7 Week First Session
    Instructor: Ann Shivers-McNair
    This seven-week, asynchronous online course introduces the theory and practice of professional and technical writing in academic, professional, and community contexts. Using open educational resources and library-accessible resources, we will learn about key concepts, values, practices, and areas of expertise. We will apply our learning in a course project that examines and reports on professional and technical writing in specific contexts chosen by students. This course fulfills a core course requirement for the undergraduate major and minor in Professional and Technical Writing.
    001 In Person
    M/W 11:00 AM-12:15 PM
    Instructor: Staff
    In this course, students learn how to apply localization strategies to the development, editing, and management of content in ways that are responsive to and inclusive of linguistic and cultural differences. This course fulfills a core course requirement for the undergraduate major and minor in Professional and Technical Writing.
    001 Live Online
    M/W 3:30-4:45 PM
    Instructor: Ann Shivers-McNair
    This course offers students an opportunity to learn and practice methods and skills in engaging user communities at every step of their writing and design processes and reporting effectively on their research. Through hands-on projects, the course provides a collaborative space for students to gain research skills, get experience, and develop communicative, cultural, and technological resources in and beyond the classroom. This course fulfills a core course requirement for the undergraduate major and minor in Professional and Technical Writing.
    110/210 Fully Online
    7 Week Second Session
    Instructor: Ann Shivers-McNair
    This course is the final step toward completing the Professional and Technical Writing Certificate at the University of Arizona. In this one-credit, pass/fail, asynchronous online course, you will work with your instructor to build a portfolio that satisfies the certificate program requirements and that is tailored to your professional interests and goals. Weekly steps, benchmarks, and feedback will help you stay on track to complete the portfolio in 7.5 weeks.