Upcoming Courses

Fall 2022 Classes 

Looking for a class in Fall 2022? Check out our great line up of literature, language, and writing courses to help round out your gen-eds, major requirements, or electives.

Visit the Schedule of Classes to find days/time for courses. Then register in the UAccess Student Center.

Schedule of Classes    UAccess Student Center

English 100 & 200 Level Courses

    101 Fully Online

    **7-Week First Session**

    Instructor: Melani Martinez

    ENGL 160A2 explores food writing and its relationship to culture. Analyzing food as both personal and cultural symbol, students will develop an appreciation for how food traditions reflect and shape cultural societies and diverse worldview. Course materials will focus on diverse perspectives with emphasis on marginalized groups such as migrant, incarcerated, and Indigenous food communities. Students will explore their own food memories in reflective writing and storytelling to find connections between personal food histories and social or environmental justice. Using various rhetorical strategies and drawing from research, field study, oral history, and lived experiences/traditional knowledge, students will practice food writing for a variety of audiences in four key genres: recipe card, profile podcast, food memoir, and manifesto. Workshop and revision will be important aspects of the course.

    101 Fully Online

    **7-Week Second Session**

    Instructor: Matthew Abraham

    As a nation we seem more divided than ever. Anger, resentment, and calls for resistance against various cultural forces have been especially prominent since January of 2017. Add to this situation a pandemic, which is straining the infrastructural resources of every country in the world, and one can understand how the phrase “world on fire” applies.[1] In this context, expressions of racism, misogyny, xenophobia toward immigrants, and general disgust directed toward those who look or behave differently become manifest. Unemployment, social marginalization, and a rapid increase in substance abuse and suicide among middle-aged men represent a societal tipping point.

    The rise of the Black Lives Matter Movement, #MeToo, and immigrant activism point to a widespread recognition of how systemic abuses of power are being resisted strongly by certain demographic sectors. At the center of this storm of protest and resistance is the presidency of Donald J. Trump, whose unprecedented campaign and election fueled the rise of large-scale resistance movements among women, ethnic minorities, environmentalists, and ordinary citizens intent on defending constitutional norms and mainstream governmental institutions. At the same time, we must recognize a backlash against these movements represented by the rise of white supremacy and white nationalism.

    In this course, we will explore the role of anger and resentment in the context of understanding this current historical and political movement that has made resistance fashionable again. How are anger and resentment mobilized to create coalitions around key social issues such as feminism (#MeToo), the Black Lives Matter Movement, immigration, as well as among those who constitute a general opposition to current policies on many fronts including healthcare, education, and corporate control of worker rights? How might we go about thinking about and discussing these oppositional movements that have tapped into widespread anger and disappointment in the state of American democracy? How have other oppositional movements, such as those expressing nativist and racial supremacist sentiments, channeled their anger and resentment in the age of Trump through social media?  These are just some of the questions that we will turn to in this seven-and-a-half-week course.

    Course Texts (available at U of A Bookstore or at an online bookstore):

    Claudia Rankine’s Just Us: An American Conversation.

    David French’s Divide We Fall: America’s Secession Threat and to Restore Our Nation.

    Batya Ungar-Sargon’s Bad News: How Woke Media is Undermining Democracy

     

    [1] See Amy Chua’s World on Fire: How Exporting Free Market Democracy Breeds Ethnic Hatred and Global Instability. Anchor Books, 2004.

    101/201 Fully Online

    **7-Week First Session**

    Instructor: Dennis Wise

    Monsters are cool—but they’re also interesting, and also sometimes deeply problematic. The category of the “non-human” (or, more broadly, “the Other”) raises key questions about human identity, human values, and the cultural boundaries we construct to cordon off the horrific, the weird, the frightening, the monstrous, or the non-human. As a result, we won’t focus simply particular monster-types like the zombie, the vampire, or the cyborg. Instead, we’ll look at monster-figures in literature and film as key indicators of cultural history: the symbolic carriers of cultural values, problems, and ideological tensions. These cultural issues can include things like political dissension, systems of religious belief, social order and disorder, human nature, or distinctions of race/class/gender. As we’ll see, monsters often become symbols in the cultural, political, and intellectual clashes that mark Western history. In order to better understand our cultural roots, then, we have to come to terms with the historical and ideological tensions behind those clashes. In this course, we’ll discuss these tensions through well-organized analytical arguments that present strong textual evidence and display critical thinking.

    201 Introduction to Nonfiction Writing

    001 In Person

    T/Th 9:30-10:45 AM

    Instructor: Staff

    Students will gain a working knowledge of these concepts and terms: memoir, personal essay, portrait, travel essay, literary journalism, narrative voice, dialogue, metaphor, image, scene, narrative summary, reflection, and research. Students will read selected texts and discuss craft elements in works of literary nonfiction. Students will develop writing skills by doing exercises and writing assignments in several modes of nonfiction writing (i.e., portrait, travel essay, memoir).

     

    201 Introduction to Nonfiction Writing

    002 In Person

    T/Th 11:00 AM-12:15 PM

    Instructor: Staff

    Students will gain a working knowledge of these concepts and terms: memoir, personal essay, portrait, travel essay, literary journalism, narrative voice, dialogue, metaphor, image, scene, narrative summary, reflection, and research. Students will read selected texts and discuss craft elements in works of literary nonfiction. Students will develop writing skills by doing exercises and writing assignments in several modes of nonfiction writing (i.e., portrait, travel essay, memoir).

     

    201 Introduction to Nonfiction Writing

    101/201 Fully Online

    **7-Week First Session**

    Instructor: Staff

    Students will gain a working knowledge of these concepts and terms: memoir, personal essay, portrait, travel essay, literary journalism, narrative voice, dialogue, metaphor, image, scene, narrative summary, reflection, and research. Students will read selected texts and discuss craft elements in works of literary nonfiction. Students will develop writing skills by doing exercises and writing assignments in several modes of nonfiction writing (i.e., portrait, travel essay, memoir).

     

     

    ENGL 209 Introduction to Poetry Writing

    001 In Person

    T/Th 11:00 AM-12:15 PM

    Instructor: Staff

    The beginning course in the undergraduate poetry-writing sequence. Method of instruction: class discussion of student poems, with some readings of modern and contemporary poetry. Workshop sections are limited to 20 students. Priority enrollment given to Creative Writing majors and minors.

     

    ENGL 209 Introduction to Poetry Writing

    002 In Person

    T/Th 12:30-1:45 PM

    Instructor: Staff

    The beginning course in the undergraduate poetry-writing sequence. Method of instruction: class discussion of student poems, with some readings of modern and contemporary poetry. Workshop sections are limited to 20 students. Priority enrollment given to Creative Writing majors and minors.

     

    209 Introduction to Poetry Writing

    110/210 Fully Online

    **7-Week Second Session**

    Instructor: Staff

    The beginning course in the undergraduate poetry-writing sequence. Method of instruction: class discussion of student poems, with some readings of modern and contemporary poetry. Workshop sections are limited to 20 students. Priority enrollment given to Creative Writing majors and minors.

    ENGL 210 Introduction to Fiction Writing
    001 In Person
    T/Th 9:30-10:45 AM
    Instructor: Staff

    The 200-level course introduces the student to craft terms and concepts through lecture, exercises, and reading selections. The workshop method introduces the sharing and critique of original student work in breakout discussion groups. Students gain a working knowledge of basic craft terms and concepts such as character, plot, setting, narrative time, dialogue, point-of-view, voice, conflict resolution, and metaphorical language. The group will analyze readings from published authors are analyzed from a writer’s perspective. Students will identify and hone the writing skills necessary for success in fiction writing. Students complete exercises based on these elements and write at least one complete short story.

     

    ENGL 210 Introduction to Fiction Writing
    002 In Person
    T/Th 11:00 AM-12:15 PM
    Instructor: Staff

    The 200-level course introduces the student to craft terms and concepts through lecture, exercises, and reading selections. The workshop method introduces the sharing and critique of original student work in breakout discussion groups. Students gain a working knowledge of basic craft terms and concepts such as character, plot, setting, narrative time, dialogue, point-of-view, voice, conflict resolution, and metaphorical language. The group will analyze readings from published authors are analyzed from a writer’s perspective. Students will identify and hone the writing skills necessary for success in fiction writing. Students complete exercises based on these elements and write at least one complete short story.

     

    ENGL 210 Introduction to Fiction Writing
    003 In Person
    T/Th 12:30-1:45 PM
    Instructor: Staff

    The 200-level course introduces the student to craft terms and concepts through lecture, exercises, and reading selections. The workshop method introduces the sharing and critique of original student work in breakout discussion groups. Students gain a working knowledge of basic craft terms and concepts such as character, plot, setting, narrative time, dialogue, point-of-view, voice, conflict resolution, and metaphorical language. The group will analyze readings from published authors are analyzed from a writer’s perspective. Students will identify and hone the writing skills necessary for success in fiction writing. Students complete exercises based on these elements and write at least one complete short story.

     
    ENGL 210 Introduction to Fiction Writing
    004 In Person
    T/Th 2:00-3:15 PM
    Instructor: Staff

    The 200-level course introduces the student to craft terms and concepts through lecture, exercises, and reading selections. The workshop method introduces the sharing and critique of original student work in breakout discussion groups. Students gain a working knowledge of basic craft terms and concepts such as character, plot, setting, narrative time, dialogue, point-of-view, voice, conflict resolution, and metaphorical language. The group will analyze readings from published authors are analyzed from a writer’s perspective. Students will identify and hone the writing skills necessary for success in fiction writing. Students complete exercises based on these elements and write at least one complete short story.

     

    ENGL 210 Introduction to Fiction Writing
    110/210 Fully Online
    **7-Week Second Session**
    Instructor: Staff

    The 200-level course introduces the student to craft terms and concepts through lecture, exercises, and reading selections. The workshop method introduces the sharing and critique of original student work in breakout discussion groups. Students gain a working knowledge of basic craft terms and concepts such as character, plot, setting, narrative time, dialogue, point-of-view, voice, conflict resolution, and metaphorical language. The group will analyze readings from published authors are analyzed from a writer’s perspective. Students will identify and hone the writing skills necessary for success in fiction writing. Students complete exercises based on these elements and write at least one complete short story.

     

     
    ENGL 215 Elements of Craft: Creative Writing
    001 In Person
    M/W 11:00 AM-12:15 PM
    Instructor: Ander Monson

    Elements of Craft is a reading, conversation, and lecture course designed to introduce writers to essential terms and concepts across the three genres that we teach at UA: poetry, fiction, and creative nonfiction. How do writers exist in the world? How do they do the magic they do with sentences and lines? We’ll be reading several books and lots of essays, poems, and stories, all weird, wild, and wonderful. Expect to get to know the work of some of the Creative Writing faculty at UA, all outstanding writers and teachers, too. We’ll pay particular attention to the ways in which writing actually gets into and functions in the world, and we’ll be in conversation with contemporary writers who’ll visit us to talk with us about how they wrote their books (and stories, poems, essays, etc). We’ll also be doing weekly writing exercises to develop your sense of craft and build revision strategies, and hopefully to kickstart and supercharge your own new work that you can develop and refine in future creative writing classes.

    ENGL 215 Elements of Craft: Creative Writing
    101 Fully Online
    **7-Week First Session**
    Instructor: Farid Matuk

    This discussion and reading based course will introduce students of creative writing to the most important terms and concepts utilized across the three genres taught at the University of Arizona: poetry, creative nonfiction and fiction. While we will spend the majority of our time reading, analyzing (from the perspective of craft) and discussing published work, students will also have a chance to experiment in their own writing with some of the tools and approaches highlighted throughout our readings and across the three genres. 

     
    ENGL 248B Introduction to Fairy Tales
    101/201 Fully Online
    Instructor: Kate Bernheimer

    “Let it Go” and come learn about fairy tales! What meaning do these beautiful tales of survival hold for you? In this class, we will read multiple variations of classic fairy tales from around the world. We will follow their breadcrumbs from communal storytelling into literary culture and Disney, and from childhood to adulthood. The folkloric writing assignments in this class are designed to spark your curiosity and encourage your confidence. Our resilient guides include Little Red Riding Hood, Donkeyskin, Hansel & Gretel, The Little Mermaid, Elsa & Anna, and others. Prepare to be enchanted. All course materials will be available on D2L, apart from “Frozen,” a movie, which you will need to rent or purchase to watch (even if you have seen it before, you'll need to see it again!).

    ENGL 263 Topics of Children’s Literature
    101 Fully Online
    **7-Week First Session**
    Instructor: Stephanie Pearmain

    From the “origins” of Children’s Literature to the current day call for diverse voices in the genre, this course examines the development of concepts of the child, children’s literature, and Western Culture. We will read a broad spectrum of historical and contemporary U.S., British, and world literature, and works representing a variety of genres and cultures. Through a survey of folk tales, picture books, middle grade novels, young adult novels, and graphic novels, we will consider the historical development of children’s literature as well as its dual agenda of instruction and amusement.

     
    ENGL 264 US Popular Culture
    101 Fully Online
    **7-Week First Session**
    Instructor: Maritza Cardenas

    What can the study of popular cultural forms like Television, Films, Advertisements, Video Games, Facebook as well as cultural practices like shopping, viewing habits, and other modes of consumption reveal about US American Values? How do representations of race, class, gender, and sexuality disseminated within these popular texts shape the way we come to see others and ourselves? These are some of the guiding questions we will be exploring in our study of U.S. popular culture. Through an examination of both critical essays and primary texts, students in this course will learn not only how to critically read and interpret various cultural forms, but also will come to understand the ways in which popular culture structures our day to day lives.

     
    ENGL 265 Major American Authors
    001 In Person
    M/W 12:30-1:45 PM
    Instructor: John Melillo

    In this iteration of “Major American Authors,” we will explore the work of many writers by examining the long relationship between music and literature in U.S. American history. We will study works from the beginning of U.S. American literary and musical culture to the present day. Examples include: The Bay Psalm Book; Henry David Thoreau’s Walden; Walt Whitman’s Leaves of Grass; poetry by Edgar Allan Poe, Emily Dickinson, T.S. Eliot, Langston Hughes, Gwendolyn Brooks, Amiri Baraka, and many more; W.E.B. Du Bois’s The Souls of Black Folk; and essays on music by Langston Hughes, John Cage, Greil Marcus, and Anne Powers. Importantly, we will listen to and read the lyrics from a wide variety of popular musics in U.S. America. These will range from anonymous folk ballads, work songs, and spirituals, to authored works by writer-performers such as Robert Johnson, Bessie Smith, Louis Armstrong, Little Richard, Bob Dylan, Patti Smith, MF Doom, Kendrick Lamar, and many more. This class will require us, as the composer Charles Ives famously stated, “to stretch our ears,” and our goal will be to listen to and for musical-literary connections that are often neglected or forgotten in contemporary popular culture. This is a writing intensive course, and we will write regularly in order to closely examine these works in relation to form, theme, and context.

    ENGL 280 Introduction to Literature
    001 In Person
    T/Th 9:30-10:45 AM
    Instructor: Staff

    Close reading of literary texts, critical analysis, and articulation of intellectually challenging ideas in clear prose.

     

    ENGL 280 Introduction to Literature
    002 Live Online
    T/Th 11:00 AM-12:15 PM
    Instructor: Daniel Cooper Alarcon

    For this section of English 280, we will read a wide-range of different types of literature: short stories, poems, plays, novels—as well as some texts that are not so easy to classify. We will discuss the challenges that each of these different literary forms present to us as readers, as we try to interpret and make sense of them. Over the course of the semester, we will discuss the varied elements that comprise literary works, the varied aspects that one might consider when analyzing a literary text, and different interpretive approaches to literature. We will also discuss literary tradition and why it matters when thinking about individual texts. For the reading list, I am selecting texts that are not only moving and meaningful, but also creative and inventive; texts that not only offer us insight into the world and its endlessly varied communities and human relationships, but also that amplify our understanding of literature and what it can do. The reading list for the course will likely include short stories and memoirs by Bret Harte, Jack London, Ernest Hemingway, John Steinbeck, Paul Bowles, Leslie Marmon Silko, and Rosario Ferré; the play “Zoot Suit,” by Luis Valdez, Volkswagen Blues (a delightful road trip novel), Jamaica Kincaid’s A Small Place, poems by Martin Espada, and Art Spiegelman’s Pulitzer prize-winning, graphic memoir about the Holocaust, Maus. Students will write three short papers over the course of the semester, and will be expected to contribute regularly to class discussion.

     

    ENGL 280 Introduction to Literature
    003 In Person
    M/W 3:30-4:45 AM
    Instructor: Staff

    Close reading of literary texts, critical analysis, and articulation of intellectually challenging ideas in clear prose.

     

    ENGL 280 Introduction to Literature
    004 In Person
    M/W 3:30-4:45 AM
    Instructor: John Melillo

    English 280 is designed to introduce students to the study of literature. We will ask some basic but difficult questions: what is literature? What are its uses and pleasures? What has been and what continues to be “literary”? To begin to answer these questions, we will study the art of reading with attention, playfulness, and joy. Our goal will be to understand, interpret, and discuss a wide variety of texts. We will look at forms of literary production that foreground the act of reading, whether by representing scenes of reading or by foregrounding methods of literary homage like quotation, imitation, and allusion. Some possible examples might be: Shakespeare’s “The Tempest;” Edgar Allen Poe’s “The Purloined Letter;” poems by Emily Dickinson, Gertrude Stein, William Carlos Williams, Alice Notley, Langston Hughes, and more; lyrics by Patti Smith, Will Oldham, MF Doom, and more. As we read examples of each of the primary literary genres—poetry, drama, and fiction—students will begin to consider how different literary works demand different kinds of reading. They will also begin to pay critical attention to the expectations and assumptions we bring to the texts we read. This is a writing-intensive course, in which students will produce essays, responses, and reports in order to think about reading in all its complexity.

    ENGL 255 Introduction to the English Language
    001 In Person
    M/W 9:30-10:45 AM
    Instructor: Staff

    Basic concepts in the study of the English language: history, semantics, phonology, morphology, syntax, and discourse. English in its social context: regional and social varieties, language acquisition, and English as an international language.

    English 300 & 400 Level Courses

    110/210 Fully Online
    **7-Week Second Session**
    Instructor: Peter Figler

    English 300 is a comparative study of literature and cinema as aesthetic media. Given the breadth and complexity of film and literature, including historical, technical, and narrative elements, our class is broken into three modules: “Film, Literature, and Aesthetics,” “Adaptation and Intertextuality,” and “Cultural and Ideological Connections.” We will survey a curated list of films and texts that serve as examples, emphasizing specific dimensions that support course outcomes. Class activities include asynchronous discussions, individual reflections, short essays, and a final multimodal project that synthesizes the course modules and materials. All of our readings and films are found on D2L, so that they may be easily accessed and revisited as often as needed. 

    001 In Person
    F 12:30-3:00 PM
    Instructor: Staff

    Practice in writing nonfiction.

    ENGL 304 Intermediate Fiction Writing Workshop
    001 In Person
    M 9:30 AM-12:00 PM
    Instructor: Bojan Louis

    Practice in writing short fiction.

     

    ENGL 304 Intermediate Fiction Writing Workshop: The Act of Writing
    002 In Person
    T 9:30 AM-12:00 PM
    Instructor: Johanna Skibsrud

    “Thinking is easy, acting is difficult, and to put one’s thoughts into action is the most difficult thing in the world.”

    ~Johann Wolfgang von Goethe

    Our challenge as writers can perhaps be no more succinctly expressed than with these words. This workshop will ask you to do “the most difficult thing in the world” with the aim of expanding your thinking, your writing, and your thinking about writing. Using interdisciplinary, embodied and interactive exercises, you will be given the opportunity to explore a range of different approaches to working with theme, style, plot, character, voice, idea, and emotion. You will be asked to leave preconceived projects and expectations at the door, to take risks, generate new writing, read and respond to a diverse and rigorous reading list, and to engage generously with your peers.  

     
    ENGL 309 Intermediate Poetry Writing Workshop
    001 In Person
    F 9:30 AM-12:00 PM
    Instructor: Staff

    Practice in writing poetry.

    ENGL 310 Literature and Philosophy
    001 In Person
    T/Th 11:00 AM-12:15 PM
    Instructor: Suresh Raval

    The origin and evolution of genres in literature, rhetoric, and nonfiction prose, among others.

     

    ENGL 314 Prison Writing Course
    001 In Person
    T/Th 12:30-1:45 PM
    Instructor: Marcia Klotz

    The Prison Writing Course encourages reflection and response to "narratives" about prison and inmates and examines larger societal issues surrounding this topic. The lectures and main assignments will encourage students to look at received perspectives of prison and prison issues (past), allow for response to issues raised in the readings and within class discussions (present), and then give students the opportunity to propose a community project that addresses some issue raised or encountered throughout the course (future).

    ENGL 360 Twenty-First Century British Literature
    001 In Person
    M/W 3:30-4:45 PM
    Instructor: Stephanie Brown

    This course aims to provide students with an overview of contemporary work produced in Britain and/or by British authors across a variety of genres (including, but not limited to, drama, fiction, and poetry). The course will contextualize this work within longer traditions of English-language literature and cultural institutions, and in terms of a variety of topics and concerns confronting contemporary British culture, society, and politics.

     
    ENGL 373A British & American Literature: Beowulf – 1660
    001 In Person
    M/W 9:30-10:45AM
    Instructor: Roger Dahood

    English 373A introduces students to major writers and genres from the Old English (Anglo-Saxon) period to the middle of the seventeenth century. By the end of the course students will have had opportunity to master ways of examining and thinking profitably about literary works through close engagement with the readings. The chronological arrangement of assignments and editors’ headnotes will contribute to a grasp of the development of English literature through time and an understanding of the historical context associated with each work.

    We begin with the Old English epic Beowulf and end with the seventeenth-century epic Paradise Lost. Lecture/discussion will aim to generate deep understanding of the readings—how their earliest audiences might have understood them and how we might engage with them today.

     

    ENGL 373B British & American Literature: Restoration to the19th Century
    001 In Person
    M/W 11:00-11:50 AM | Discussion Sections: 001A: F; 11:00-11:50 | 001B: F; 1:00-1:50
    Instructor: Paul Hurh

    A survey of literature written in English from the 17th through the 19th centuries. This course will read broadly through multiple significant literary movements and traditions during the period.

    Students will work in small groups to generate blogs that engage with the literature in unique and contemporary ways.  Memes, listicles, clickbait, hot takes, deep dives, and other forms of experimental and informal writing will explore the relevance of the English literary tradition today.

    ENGL 380 Literary Analysis
    001 In Person
    M/W 12:30-1:45 PM
    Instructor: Roger Dahood

    Introduction to the various modes, techniques, and terminology of practical criticism.

     

    ENGL 380 Literary Analysis: The Rural and the Pastoral
    003 Live Online
    M/W 11:00 AM-12:15 PM
    Instructor: Tenney Nathanson

    This is a course in “close reading.” The reading assignments will be short, to allow us to pay close attention to individual texts and individual passages. We’ll read many poems some short stories, and perhaps one novel, with an eye toward mastering the close reading techniques crucial to the sort of literary analysis we practice in upper-division literature courses (and beyond). Regular class attendance and regular participation in class discussions and online discussion boards are required. Students will write roughly 6-8 short papers (1-2 pp. each), and 2 somewhat longer papers (3-5 pp. each). There are no exams.

    Questions? Please email the instructor at nathanso@arizona.edu

     

    ENGL 380 Literary Analysis
    004 In Person
    TBD
    Instructor: Peter Figler

    English 380 is a course in advanced literary analysis, emphasizing close reading and critical theory. We will study several key theoretical and historical movements as they relate to literature and literary form, focusing most closely on the novel, though we will examine other genres and forms along the way. Classes will generally be driven by discussion and interpretation, though on occasion I will lecture. The final texts and authors are being determined but will include authors such as Toni Morrison, Colson Whitehead, Jhumpa Lahiri, Don DeLillo, Kyle Baker, and others.

     
    ENGL 396A Junior Proseminar
    001 In Person
    T/Th 2:00-3:15 PM
    Instructor: Jennifer Jenkins

    This Junior research seminar will focus on the idea of the archive as cabinet of curiosity, taxonomy, trope, metaphor, and form in literature, the visual arts, and film. We will examine the evolution of spaces of control, collection, and concealment or display in literary works, museums, and film as they are organized by taxonomies and epistemologies. In addition to learning about traditional archives, we will confront the nature of the born-digital archive and the implications of both legacy and virtual archives for literary research. We will remember (or learn) to read cursive

    handwriting through paleography exercises. Student term projects, chosen in consultation with me, will integrate archival research into topics from across a variety of English-related disciplines in the humanities and human sciences. Curiosity required.

     

    ENGL 396A Faulkner and Morrison
    002 In Person
    T/T 11:00 AM-12:15 PM
    Instructor: Professor Selisker

    This junior proseminar on research methods will focus on two major American authors: William Faulkner and Toni Morrison. Both authors explored themes including memory, family, the legacies of American slavery, and the meanings of identity. They used innovative techniques that make their work both challenging and rewarding, and their influence shows in much contemporary literary writing. We'll focus on Faulkner's The Sound and the Fury and Morrison's Song of Solomon and Beloved, alongside a number of short stories, literary essays by these authors and others, and secondary readings. We'll deepen our understanding of both authors by reading into their historical contexts (literary, political, philosophical) and by exploring a range of strategies for interpreting their work. Students will write three short papers and complete regular short assignments that will aid them in developing one of the papers into a longer research paper.

     

    ENGL 401 Advanced Nonfiction
    001 In Person
    W 3:30-6:00 PM
    Instructor: Ander Monson

    The Advanced Nonfiction Workshop is where you’ll start new nonfiction projects and continue old ones. We’ll further refine our craft through writing and revising creative nonfiction, with a particular eye on the ways in which the ways writers of nonfiction interact with the world. With a focus on research and going out into the world to bring stuff back, we write by bringing the world to the self and the self to the world. We’ll write about food, music, science, landscape, ourselves, other people, and other weird phenomena. We’ll write and publish new work and become better readers, writers, and citizens.

    ENGL 404 Advanced Fiction Writing
    001 In Person
    M 12:30-3:00 PM
    Instructor: Manuel Muñoz  

    This is a Writing Emphasis Course for the Creative Writing Major. Discussion of student stories in a workshop setting.

     

    ENGL 404 Advanced Fiction Writing
    002 In Person
    T 3:30-6:00 PM
    Instructor: Manuel Muñoz 

    This is a Writing Emphasis Course for the Creative Writing Major. Discussion of student stories in a workshop setting.

    ENGL 409 Advanced Poetry Writing
    001 In Person
    W 12:30-3:00 PM
    Instructor: Farid Matuk

    As the advanced course in our sequence, this iteration of ENGL 409 requires you to practice habits that will sustain your poetry writing long after you’ve earned your degree: discussing your friends’ drafts and contemporary books of poetry, and writing your own poems with an eye toward creating longer, collected works that you could submit for chapbook and even full-length book publication. 

    ENGL 431A Shakespeare
    001 In Person
    T/Th 9:00-10:45 AM
    Instructor: Kyle DiRoberto

    This course will introduce you to Shakespeare’s early comedies, histories, and tragedies. We will contextualize his works in the historical realities of the early modern period. Roughly corresponding to the reign of Queen Elizabeth, the early plays significantly focus on gender, the body, and the construction of power. But we will also learn about the major preoccupations of the Elizabethan era, paying particular attention to the social, political, economic, legal, and religious changes that are reflected in the plays. Finally, as Mark Olshaker reminds us, “every age . . . gets the Shakespeare it deserves,” and as the experience of our current age is informed by its relationship to new media and the globe, our exploration of Shakespeare will also include the proliferation of interpretations that a post-print global culture demands. Not only will we read, interpret, and write about Shakespeare, but we will also explore the adaptation of Shakespeare in both Western and non-Western productions, social media, and digital games.

     

    ENGL 430 User Experience Research
    150 Fully Online
    Instructor: Ann Shivers-McNair

    This course offers students an opportunity to learn and practice methods and skills in engaging user communities at every step of their writing and design processes and reporting effectively on their research. By partnering with UX@UA, the course provides a user-centered, collaborative space for students to gain research skills, work on projects connected to their interests, and develop communicative, cultural, and technological resources in and beyond the classroom.

     

    ENGL 431B Shakespeare
    001 In Person
    T/Th 12:30-1:45 PM
    Instructor: Kyle DiRoberto

    This course will focus on a selection of Shakespeare’s late comedies, tragedies, and romances. We will examine the art of these plays, looking at Shakespeare’s language, his dramatic technique, and his development as an artist. To gain a more complete understanding of these works, we will also study them in their historical context. The birth of nationalism, the emergence of capitalism, and the Reformation, for example, will involve us in discussions of economic, religious, racial, and gendered identity. But we will not limit ourselves to just this plurality of forces.  Employing the interdisciplinary theorizations of Shakespeare in the twenty-first century, we will also consider how alternative subjectivities reconfigure our understanding of authorship both then and now. By employing actor-network theory, new materialism, and posthumanism, we will explore how these plays and their modern adaptation offer creative potentialities and new networks of understanding.   

    001 In Person

    M/W 3:30-4:45 PM

    Instructor: Tenney Nathanson

    Contemporary American poetry both extends and morphs the restless experimental energies and grand ambitions of the great American modernists.  We’ll read contemporary (post WW2-present) poetry both as a dialogic response to the modern tradition and as an engagement with contemporary political, economic, and cultural developments. Poets to be studied may include, among others: Elizabeth Bishop, Frank O’Hara, John Ashbery, Philip Whalen, Charles Bernstein, Ron Silliman, Leslie Scalapino, Norman Fischer, Mei-Mei Berssenbrugge, Erica Hunt, Harryette Mullen, Tracie Morris, Heriberto Yépez.  (We won’t read all these poets: a reading list of seven to eight writers is most likely.)  Principal requirements: three short papers (3-5 pp. each), or two short papers plus a journal of imitations; a final exam. 

     
    ENGL 496A Travel Narratives, Travel Fictions
    001 LIVE ONLINE
    T/T 11:00 AM-12:15 PM
    Instructor: Daniel Cooper Alarcon

    This course will provide an opportunity to read, consider, and discuss a diverse array of texts we might broadly categorize as travel literature.  Our goal will be to identify the conventions of the various manifestations of this genre, as well as the different kinds of cultural work that travel literature performs at different historical moments.  As our starting point, we will take the European discovery of the New World in the late fifteenth century, and pay attention to the ways that travel narratives became a crucial means by which Europeans attempted to understand and control this exotic, new space and its inhabitants.  As the course progresses, we’ll think about how travel narratives were altered to accommodate new philosophies, ideologies, and artistic movements, and, as I hope the term “travel fictions” suggests, we will think about how and why these narratives often misrepresent, distort, and fabricate notions about the people and places they purport to describe.  We will also read a wide range of travel fictions that purposefully raise questions about different types of travel, including exploration, tramping, immigration, and tourism.  And, we’ll consider how travel narratives and travel fictions often borrow from one another, mutually reinforcing ideas, tropes, and modes of representation.  Finally, we’ll think about how reading and writing have become an integral part of traveling–shaping not just itineraries, but perceptions and beliefs about the places travelers visit.

    We will read the novels The Sheltering Sky, Jasmine, and Volkswagen Blues, as well as shorter works by Jack London, Maria Cristina Mena, John Steinbeck, Jamaica Kincaid, Rudolfo Anaya, and Leslie Marmon Silko, as well as other selections, yet to be determined.  Students will write three medium-length papers over the course of the semester, and will be expected to participate regularly in class discussion.  Please note that this course will be conducted Live Online.

    ENGL 400 Themes in Literature and Film
    001 In Person
    T/Th 3:30-4:45 PM
    Instructor: Jennifer Jenkins

    This course examines cinema as a major narrative form of the 20th century. We will begin with the earliest French and American experiments in visual storytelling in short films and animation. Then we will trace the development of film narrative and its derivation from literary forms through the silent comedy and horror to Hollywood narrative genres, such as the Western, the screwball comedy, the musical, the suspense film. Students should expect to commit to substantive reading, writing, and viewing. Assignments will require close narrative analysis of film on the shot, sequence, and plot levels and mastery of the vocabulary and precepts of narrative and film studies.

    ENGL 486 Topics in American Literature
    001 In Person
    M/W 2:00-3:15 PM
    Instructor: Paul Hurh

    A consideration of important authors, works, and themes in American literature.

    ENGL 488B American Poetry: Twentieth Century
    001 Live Online
    M/W 2:00-3:15 PM
    Instructor: Tenney Nathanson

    American poets were instrumental in shaping the movement known as modernism. Stressing experiment and innovation, their work challenged conventional conceptions of poetry, creating a hyper-textual space in which competing idioms, discourses, and models of social and political action could jostle freely. (Contemporary poetry, especially so-called “composition by field,” is very much an outgrowth of modernist practice.) We will focus on the work of such major American modernist poets as Eliot, Pound, Williams, H.D., Stevens, Moore, and Crane. We will stress close reading of individual poems but will also explore modernism as a program of literary and cultural innovation. Requirements: three short papers (3-5 pp. each), or two short papers plus a journal of imitations; a final exam.

    ENGL 489B Contemporary American Literature: Books in Dialogue
    001 Live Online
    T/Th 2:00-3:15 PM
    Instructor: Daniel Cooper Alarcon

    In this upper-division course, we will read, examine, and discuss pairs of literary works by contemporary American authors that overlap and engage thematically with each other in meaningful ways.  The reading list is still taking shape, but will probably include works by Cormac McCarthy, Julia Alvarez, Junot Díaz, Ana Castillo, Jacques Poulin, and Cecile Pineda.  Students will be expected to participate regularly in class discussion, and to write two or three short papers over the course of the semester.

     
    ENGL490: Career and Professional Development for English, Creative Writing, and Professional and Technical Writing Majors and Minors 
    1 CREDIT, In Person, First 7-Week Session
    W 5:00-6:40 PM 
    Instructor: Steph Brown 

    This course will focus on a selection of Shakespeare’s late comedies, tragedies, and romances. We will examine the art of these plays, looking at Shakespeare’s language, his dramatic technique, and his development as an artist. To gain a more complete understanding of these works, we will also study them in their historical context. We will learn about the major preoccupations of the Jacobean era, paying particular attention to the social, political, economic, legal, and religious changes that are reflected in the plays. Finally, as Mark Olshaker reminds us, " every age . . . gets the Shakespeare it deserves," and as the experience of our current age is informed by its relationship to new media and the globe, our exploration of Shakespeare will also include the proliferation of interpretations and adaptations that a post-print global culture demands. Not only will we read, interpret, and write about Shakespeare, but we will also explore the adaptation of Shakespeare in both Western and non-Western productions, social media, digital games, and virtual reality. 

     

    ENGL 495P Career and Professional Development Class for Creative Writing Majors
    001 In Person
    F 10:00-11:40
    Instructor: Susan Briante

    A 1-credit workshop in translating, adapting, and applying Creative Writing major skills to multiple career paths. Students will research career fields and graduate and preprofessional programs and be in conversation with professionals from these fields. Students will finish with an informed and workshopped set of application materials for an entry-level career position or a graduate program.

    ENGL 362 Rhetorical Inquiry
    001 In Person
    M/W 11:00 AM-12:15 PM
    Instructor: Matthew Abraham

    While the art of rhetoric is often thought about in relation to persuasion and to a host of classical figures such as Plato, Aristotle, Quintilian, Cicero, and the Sophists, it provides a much larger framework that helps us to explain and understand modern social phenomena such as the concepts of “post-truth” and “fake news” in modern culture, as well as the rise of demagogic and authoritarian figures in the context of populist political movements. For example, we see how prevalent references to “fake news” and “post-truth” have become in media discourse, where even science and objectivity have been called into question because of their connections to power and corruption. In this context, one gets to choose literally what she or he would like to believe about the external world because there is probably a community out there that will support it. What problems are posed for public discourse and deliberation when questions about representation become so prevalent? This is a major question we will consider in this class.

    By examining rhetorical traditions, we will lay the ground to understand how language and rhetoric have been used and abused by those in power.  By understanding how rhetoric has developed throughout history as a tool of persuasion and manipulation, we will develop a greater appreciation of how the use of language in various contexts shapes our framing of reality. This is especially important as we enter what has been labeled as a “post-truth” era, where the very ability to represent “facts” and “reality” have been called into question.

    Whether you are interested in the representation and treatment of minorities and women under the Trump administration, have an abiding interest in the rapid growth and influence of  social movements such as #MeToo or Black Lives Matter, or have wondered why our current political moment is so unbelievable, you will be able to see the applicability of rhetoric to the emergence of social concerns and the growth of social movements in the public sphere.

    ENGL 455 Teaching English as a Second Language
    001 In Person
    T/Th 11:00 AM-12:15 PM
    Instructor: Staff

    A general overview of the profession covering prominent theories, methodologies, and procedures influencing the field.

    ENGL 460 Romantic Literature
    001 In Person
    T/Th 12:30-1:45 PM
    Instructor: Lynda Zwinger

    Study of selected Romantic poets and their contemporaries.

     

    001 Live Online
    M/W 2:00-3:15 PM
    Instructor: Tenney Nathanson

    American poets were instrumental in shaping the movement known as modernism.  Stressing experiment and innovation, their work challenged conventional conceptions of poetry, creating a hyper-textual space in which competing idioms, discourses, and models of social and political action could jostle freely.  (Contemporary poetry, especially so-called “composition by field,” is very much an outgrowth of modernist practice.)  We will focus on the work of such major American modernist poets as Eliot, Pound, Williams, H.D., Stevens, Moore, and Crane.  We will stress close reading of individual poems but will also explore modernism as a program of literary and cultural innovation.  Requirements: three short papers (3-5 pp. each), or two short papers plus a journal of imitations; a final exam. 

    001 IN PERSON
    M/W 2:00-3:15 PM
    Instructor: Paul Hurh
    This seminar focuses on the romantic tradition of American literature in the nineteenth century.  Key authors include:  Edgar Allan Poe, Nathaniel Hawthorne, Herman Melville, Frederick Douglass, Emily Dickinson, and Walt Whitman.  We will explore how these literary artists responded to their historical and biographical context, and pay special attention to what we might learn from their work to apply to the problems and questions of today.

    Professional & Technical Writing Courses

    ENGL 313 Intro to Professional and Technical Writing
    101/201 Fully Online
    **7-Week First Session**
    Instructor: Staff

    An introduction to key concepts and practices of professional and technical writing.

     

    ENGL 313 Intro to Professional and Technical Writing
    110/210 Fully Online
    **7-Week First Session**
    Instructor: Staff

    An introduction to key concepts and practices of professional and technical writing.

    ENGL 494P Portfolios in Professional and Technical Writing
    110/210 Fully Online
    **7-Week First Session**
    Instructor: Staff

    Students will explore the theories and practices of professional and academic portfolios while simultaneously designing and developing an adaptive identity and a professional persona for post-graduate settings. Students will synthesize work from past and present courses and experiences. They will make complex composition decisions about content, design, structure, and media of their portfolios in connection with identifiable elements of a given rhetorical situation. Students will discuss and apply legal and ethical issues related to portfolio development and publication of 21st century digital identities.

    ENGL 430 User Experience Research in Professional and Technical Writing
    150 Fully Online
    Instructor: Ann Shivers-McNair

    This course offers students an opportunity to learn and practice methods and skills in engaging user communities at every step of their writing and design processes and reporting effectively on their research. By partnering with the campus-wide, interdisciplinary User Experience Initiative (UXI), located in the LifeLab in the Student Union, the course provides a user-centered, collaborative space for students to gain research skills, work on projects connected to their interests, and develop communicative, cultural, and technological resources in and beyond the classroom.