News & Events

Fenton Johnson's essay “Power and Obedience:  Restoring Pacifism to American Politics,” which ran in Appalachian Heritage last spring, has been nominated for a Pushcart Award.  It will be the basis of his First Friday lecture at 1 pm on Friday, November 7, in MLNG 451, as part of the Convergences “War” series.
MFA student Francisco Cantú's Bowden piece went up today at Guernica.  
RCTE professor Adela C. Licona has collaboratively co-authored two community research briefs including LGBTQ Youth of Color: Discipline Disparities, School Push-Out, and the School-to-Prison Pipeline and  Gender Nonconforming Youth: Discipline Disparities, School Push-Out, and the School-to-Prison Pipeline.   Burdge, H., Licona, A. C., Hyemingway, Z. T. (2014). LGBTQ Youth of Color:...
RCTE Alum Susan Meyers is coming out with an academic book and a novel: Del Otro Lado: Literacy and Migration across the U.S.-Mexico Border   Failing the Trapeze (winner of the 2013 Nilsen Literary Prize for first novel)  
Fri, 11/07/2014 - 12:00pm
1. Professor Sonia Shiri, School of Middle Eastern and North African Studies
Revolution in Tunisia: Protest Signs, Graffiti and Facebook
 
2. Professor Fenton Johnson, Dept. of English
Power and Obedience:  Restoring Pacifism to American Politics
Throughout American history, pacifism, though never a majority sentiment, has played a role in shaping national perspectives on war and peace.  But as...
Fri, 12/05/2014 - 12:00pm

1. Professor John Warnock, Dept. of English

"Launch Control"

 

A reading from a piece about a visit in March 2012 to  a Minuteman III Launch Control Center in the missile field outside of F. E. Warren Air Force Base in Cheyenne, Wyoming

 

2. Professor Johanna Skibsrud, Dept. of English
"If I Were Human: Reflections on 100 Years of War"
Thu, 04/16/2015 (All day)
Please save the date for the 27th Annual Arizona Quarterly Symposium on Thursday April 16 through Saturday April 18, 2015, at the Transitional Office Building: 1731 E. Second St. (across from the softball field). The event is free and open to the public. Funded by the Department of English and Arizona Quarterly, A Journal of American Literature, Culture, and Theory. Check http...

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Bookshelf

Ground|Water. The Art, Design and Science of a Dry River

Ellen McMahon, Ander Monson, Beth Weinstein Eds.

Ground|Water is an ode to a dry river, the kind of river most familiar to those who dwell in Southern Arizona. It is also an experiment in making something beautiful from something that has been desecrated. And it is a strong message about community and responsibility.

What You See in the Dark by Manuel Muñoz

“You’ll understand one day, her mother had said at the bus station. When you find a man of your own, you’ll know why you’ll run toward him.”
A penetrating look at people searching for meaning and authenticity in lives played out under watchful eyes, this thoroughly original work is intense and fascinating in its juxtapositions of tenderness and menace, violence and regret, and its atmosphere recreation of a place on a brink of change.

Genius Loci by Alison Deming

From a poet and essayist whose writing about nature has won her comparisons with Gary Snyder and Terry Tempest Williams comes a new collection that offers further evidence of her ability to trace the intersections of the human and nonhuman worlds. The title poem is a lyrical excavation of the city of Prague, where layers of history, culture and nature have accumulated to form “a genius loci”—a guardian spirit.
From Penguin.Com
 

Crossing the River by Fenton Johnson

THE IDEA PULSED WITH ROMANCE, BUT THE ACT WAS RASH, RECKLESS – AND IRREVOCABLE.
Carrying her Confederate heritage like a flag, Martha Bragg Pickett was as stubborn as her red hair. And hungry for life. On a dare she crossed the river, leaving the safe, abstaining, Baptist, Southern side and venturing over to the dangerous, rowdy, Catholic Northern side. And when that proved less than thrilling, she marched her young self right into the (men only) Miracle Inn, which got a rise...

Rope by Alison Deming

Alison Hawthorne Deming ’s fourth collection of poems follows the paths of imagination into meditations on salt, love, Hurricane Katrina, Greek myth, and the search for extraterrestrial life, all linked by the poet’s faith in art as an instrument for creating meaning, beauty, and continuity—virtues diminished by the velocity and violence of our historical moment. The final long poem “The Flight,” inspired by the works of A. R. Ammons, is a twenty-first century epic poised on the verge of our...

Rhetorics of the Americas: 3114 BCE to 2012 CE by Damian Baca

This is the first work to begin to fill a gap: an understanding of discourse aimed to persuade within the Pre-Columbian Americas. The contributors in this collection offer glimpses of what those Indigenous rhetorics might have looked like and how their influences remain. The reader is invited to recognize “the invention of the Americas,” providing other ways to contemplate material life prior to contemporary capitalism, telling us about the global from long ago to current global capitalism....

Swamp Isthmus by Joshua Marie Wilkinson

Swamp Isthmus takes the stripped, lyric voice of Selenography, the first book of Wilkinson’s No Volta pentalogy, and confronts a pre-apocalyptic vision of American urban life. Here, the city and forest are one, as are the river and sewer. The ghost and the body are one, and the buildings and the trees, the sidewalks and the switchbacks all fuse. The poems in Swamp Isthmus create the flipside of the pastoral—the urban returns to the rural, their fates...

A Palace of Pearls by Jane Miller

In this book-length sequence, animated by a confrontation with her dead father, Jane Miller meditates on home, love, war and the responsibility of the poet. A Palace of Pearls is inspired by one of the most spectacular civilizations in history, the Arab kingdom of Al-Andalus—a Middle Age civilization where architecture, science and art flourished and Christians, Jews, and Muslims lived in relative harmony. The reader roams through "rooms," encountering Greek, Judaic, and Roman mythology, and...

Grounds of Literary Criticism by Suresh Raval

Between the foundationalist stance that seeks to eliminate disputes by finding the right answers and the relativist postion that regards disagreements as pointless quarrels that can never be resolved, Suresh Raval advocates a refreshing new perspective: a rehabilitation of controversy that recognizes the essentially contestable nature of critical concepts.
Proposing an antifoundationalist exploration of the problems of literary criticism and theory, Raval argues that critical debates, though...

The Available World by Ander Monson

“[Ander Monson’s] poems celebrate defiant excess. In this land of scarcity, right-living involves using up what you have, where you have it; otherwise someone might wreck, steal, or use it and you might not get any. A carpe diem for obscure, doomed youth.”—Stephen Burt