News & Events

Nina Boutsikaris' (MFA 2015) piece "What Doo Wop Does" is a finalist in the 2014 Mid-American Review Fineline Competition. It will be published in their fall print issue.
Kenny Walker, RCTE Ph.D. student's publication entitled “A Choreography of Living Texts: Selections from the ARST Oral History Project” has been published in Rhetoric Review.  
Jan Bindas-Tenney's essay "How to do Laundry" is forthcoming in Issue #9 of Cactus Heart Press and her essay "Bow Down Bitches" is featured as part of a queer summer web feature in CutBank Literary Magazine's "All Accounts and Mixture"
Alison Hawthorne Deming's new nonfiction book Zoologies: On Animals and Human Spirit will be out in early fall. Essays from the collection are coming out in journals include "Patativa," "Chimera" and "Bobcat" in The Georgia Review;  "The Sacred Pig" in Eleven Eleven; "The Cheetah Run" in terrain.org, "The Pony, The Pig, The Horse" in Ecotone and "...
Fri, 09/05/2014 - 12:00pm
Opening Panel, featuring Lee Medovoi and Charlie Scruggs (English Department) and other faculty. 
Fri, 11/07/2014 - 12:00pm
Fenton Johnson, Dept. of English
 
Fri, 12/05/2014 - 12:00pm
John Warnock, Dept. of English
Johanna Skibsrud, Dept. of English

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Bookshelf

The Colors of Nature by Alison Deming

The Colors of Nature: Culture, Identity, and the Natural World is an anthology that doesn’t operate merely as a collection of essays and poems by writers of color and their reflections about the natural world. Rather, the anthology is a sophisticated argument expertly structured around the following question: “Why is there so little ‘nature writing’ by people of color?”—Oliver de la Paz

The Anxiety of Everyday Objects by Aurelie Sheehan

Excerpt from Chapter One

All good secretaries will eventually find truth in the hearts of men.
Winona Bartlett, Win to her friends, might not have been the world’s best secretary, but her nature was such that serving, subservience, and coffee service came easily, and, in fact, she felt there was an inherent good in doing things well, and this determination more than equaled her actual interest in the long-term prospects at Grecko Mauster Crill. She practiced her secretarial role as a Zen...

How a Mother Weaned Her Girl from Fairy Tales: and Other Stories by Kate Bernheimer




Elegant and brutal, the stories in Kate Bernheimer's latest collection occupy a heightened landscape, where the familiar cedes to the grotesque and nonsense just as often devolves into terror. These are fairy tales out of time, renewing classic stories we think we know, like one of Bernheimer's girls, whose hands of steel turn to flowers, leaving her beautiful but alone.
Kate Bernheimer is the author of the short story collection Horse, Flower, Bird and the editor of My Mother She Killed Me...

Crossing the River by Fenton Johnson

THE IDEA PULSED WITH ROMANCE, BUT THE ACT WAS RASH, RECKLESS – AND IRREVOCABLE.
Carrying her Confederate heritage like a flag, Martha Bragg Pickett was as stubborn as her red hair. And hungry for life. On a dare she crossed the river, leaving the safe, abstaining, Baptist, Southern side and venturing over to the dangerous, rowdy, Catholic Northern side. And when that proved less than thrilling, she marched her young self right into the (men only) Miracle Inn, which got a rise...

A Palace of Pearls by Jane Miller

In this book-length sequence, animated by a confrontation with her dead father, Jane Miller meditates on home, love, war and the responsibility of the poet. A Palace of Pearls is inspired by one of the most spectacular civilizations in history, the Arab kingdom of Al-Andalus—a Middle Age civilization where architecture, science and art flourished and Christians, Jews, and Muslims lived in relative harmony. The reader roams through "rooms," encountering Greek, Judaic, and Roman mythology, and...

Hope is the Thing with Feathers by Chris Cokinos

A prizewinning poet and nature writer weaves together natural history, biology, sociology, and personal narrative to tell the story of the lives, habitats, and deaths of six extinct bird species.
 
“This story – of the ghost species still haunting this continent – is full of power and mystery.”

Bill McKibben, author of The End of Nature
“I was mesmerized by this fine book and felt in reading these lost natural histories as if I had both been given a gift and had one taken away.”...

Ground|Water. The Art, Design and Science of a Dry River

Ellen McMahon, Ander Monson, Beth Weinstein Eds.

Ground|Water is an ode to a dry river, the kind of river most familiar to those who dwell in Southern Arizona. It is also an experiment in making something beautiful from something that has been desecrated. And it is a strong message about community and responsibility.
Manuel Muñoz’s stories move beyond traditional themes of Chicano literature to explore conflicts of family, memory, longing, and loss. In the lonely rural towns of California’s Central Valley, his characters struggle to maintain hope and independence in the face of isolation. In the title story, a teenager learns the consequences of succumbing to the lure of a stranger; in another, a young farmworker attempts to hide his supervision of a huddle of children from the police. Bighearted and...

Zines in Third Space: Radical Cooperation and Borderlands Rhetoric by Adela C. Licona

Zines in Third Space develops third-space theory with a practical engagement in the subcultural space of zines as alternative media produced specifically by feminists and queers of color. Adela C. Licona explores how borderlands rhetorics function in feminist and queer of-color zines to challenge dominant knowledges as well as normativitizing mis/representations, Licona characterizes these as zines as thrid-space sites of borderlands rhetorics revealing dissident performances,...

Swamp Isthmus by Joshua Marie Wilkinson

Swamp Isthmus takes the stripped, lyric voice of Selenography, the first book of Wilkinson’s No Volta pentalogy, and confronts a pre-apocalyptic vision of American urban life. Here, the city and forest are one, as are the river and sewer. The ghost and the body are one, and the buildings and the trees, the sidewalks and the switchbacks all fuse. The poems in Swamp Isthmus create the flipside of the pastoral—the urban returns to the rural, their fates...