News & Events

MFA student Miguel Angel Ramirez's  "A rebel tongues still" will appear in the upcoming issue of Ple​iades.
Jon Riccio has two poems, "OctoHaiku" and "Five Fragments," up at White Whale Review.  
Michelle Denham was awarded one of the $2,500 Writing Program Fellowships.  Maggie Happe was awarded the Johnnie Raye Harper Teaching Award of $200. Emma Miller was awarded the Barry Briggs Teaching Award of $200. Emily Palese was nominated for the Johnnie Raye Harper Teaching Award. Tesica Starkey was nominated for theJohnnie Raye Harper Teaching Award. Madison Bertenshaw was nominated tor the...
MFA Associate Professor Susan Briante was highlighted in the Association of Writers and Writing Programs (AWP) Spotlight.

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Bookshelf

Intellectual Resistance and the Struggle for Palestine by Matthew Abraham

"Drawing on the magisterial writings of Edward Said and Franz Fanon, Matthew Abraham has written a brilliant and balanced critique of academic Zionism and a robust defense of Palestinian resistance to Israeli ethnic cleansing." - James Petras, Bartle Professor Emeritus, Binghamton University, USA
 
Intellectual Resistance and the Struggle for Palestine looks at the Question of Palestine as a site of controversy, a place of physical and intellectual repression as well as physical and...

Keeping Faith by Fenton Johnson

WINNER OF A LAMBDA LITERARY AWARD AND A KENTUCKY LITERARY AWARD
In a resonant account of his spiritual quest, Fenton Johnson examines what it means for a skeptic to have and to keep faith. Exploring Western and Eastern monastic traditions, Johnson lives as a member of the community at the Trappist Abbey of Gethsemani in Kentucky and the branches of the San Francisco Zen Center. Ultimately his encounter with Buddhism brings him to a new understanding and embrace of Christianity. Weaving together...

Genius Loci by Alison Deming

From a poet and essayist whose writing about nature has won her comparisons with Gary Snyder and Terry Tempest Williams comes a new collection that offers further evidence of her ability to trace the intersections of the human and nonhuman worlds. The title poem is a lyrical excavation of the city of Prague, where layers of history, culture and nature have accumulated to form “a genius loci”—a guardian spirit.
From Penguin.Com
 

The Available World by Ander Monson

“[Ander Monson’s] poems celebrate defiant excess. In this land of scarcity, right-living involves using up what you have, where you have it; otherwise someone might wreck, steal, or use it and you might not get any. A carpe diem for obscure, doomed youth.”—Stephen Burt

The Colors of Nature by Alison Deming

The Colors of Nature: Culture, Identity, and the Natural World is an anthology that doesn’t operate merely as a collection of essays and poems by writers of color and their reflections about the natural world. Rather, the anthology is a sophisticated argument expertly structured around the following question: “Why is there so little ‘nature writing’ by people of color?”—Oliver de la Paz

How a Mother Weaned Her Girl from Fairy Tales: and Other Stories by Kate Bernheimer




Elegant and brutal, the stories in Kate Bernheimer's latest collection occupy a heightened landscape, where the familiar cedes to the grotesque and nonsense just as often devolves into terror. These are fairy tales out of time, renewing classic stories we think we know, like one of Bernheimer's girls, whose hands of steel turn to flowers, leaving her beautiful but alone.
Kate Bernheimer is the author of the short story collection Horse, Flower, Bird and the editor of My Mother She Killed Me...

My Mother She Killed Me, My Father He ate Me: Forty New Fairy Tales edited by Kate Bernheimer

Props? Already on the ready. The slipper, the spindle, the seashell, the sword. The coach, the comb, the cauldron, the cape. The apple, the bread, and the porridge. And look, even simpler things in the dusty shadows, from earier iterations of these tales. The feather, the stone, the bucket of water; the knife, the bone, the bucket of blood. —from the foreword by Gregory Maguire
Contributors to this anthology include Kim Addonizio, Neil Gaiman, Hiromi Itō, Ilya Kaminsky, Jonathan Keats, Lydia...

Geography of the Heart by Fenton Johnson

With grace and affection, Johnson recounts the history of “how I fell in love, how I came to be with someone else, and how he came to death and how I helped, how in the end love enables us to continue beyond death.” At the same time, Johnson interweaves two stories: his own upbringing as the youngest of a Kentucky whiskey maker’s nine children, and that of his lover Larry Rose, the only child of German Jews, survivors of the Holocaust. Johnson’s writing has been described by Barbara Kingsolver...

Gaming Matters: Art, Science, and Magic and the Computer Game Medium by Judd Ethan Ruggill and Ken S. McAllister

In Gaming Matters, Judd Ethan Ruggill and Ken S. McAllister offer a playful and provocative look at the computer game medium, arguing that games are:

Idiosyncratic, and thus difficult to apprehend using the traditional tools of media study

Irreconcilable, or complex to such a degree that developers, players, and scholars have contradictory ways of describing them

Boring, and therefore obligated to constantly make demands

on players' attention

Anachronistic, or built on age-old...

What You See in the Dark by Manuel Muñoz

“You’ll understand one day, her mother had said at the bus station. When you find a man of your own, you’ll know why you’ll run toward him.”
A penetrating look at people searching for meaning and authenticity in lives played out under watchful eyes, this thoroughly original work is intense and fascinating in its juxtapositions of tenderness and menace, violence and regret, and its atmosphere recreation of a place on a brink of change.