News & Events

MFA student Nina Boutsikaris was named a finalist in the Tucson Festival of Books Literary Awards!
MFA student Jon Riccio's poem "Fire Escape" was just published online at FORTH.  
Recent MFA graduate Kati Standefer's essay "Wilderness" was a Finalist for the Tucson Festival of Books Literary Award for Creative Nonfiction.
Literature PhD candidate Emily Lyons has been awarded the Spring 2015 Patrick Dissertation Fellowship. "Her dissertation, titled "Visual Authority: Patriarchy, Science, and Imperialism in Nineteenth Century British Literature,"  charts how practices, discourses, and technologies of observation used to enforce the patriarchal-imperialist paradigm are reflected and subverted in nineteenth-century...
Thu, 04/16/2015 (All day)
Please save the date for the 27th Annual Arizona Quarterly Symposium on Thursday April 16 through Saturday April 18, 2015, at the Transitional Office Building: 1731 E. Second St. (across from the softball field). The event is free and open to the public. Funded by the Department of English and Arizona Quarterly, A Journal of American Literature, Culture, and Theory. Check http...

Thursday, January 1, 2015

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Jan 29 2015 - 7:00pm to 9:00pm
 
 
 

Bookshelf

What You See in the Dark by Manuel Muñoz

“You’ll understand one day, her mother had said at the bus station. When you find a man of your own, you’ll know why you’ll run toward him.”
A penetrating look at people searching for meaning and authenticity in lives played out under watchful eyes, this thoroughly original work is intense and fascinating in its juxtapositions of tenderness and menace, violence and regret, and its atmosphere recreation of a place on a brink of change.
Jewelry Box by Aurelie Sheehan

 

The sixty-eight short works in this collection (some only a paragraph, others a few pages) straddle memoir and fiction, exploring the nuances of sexuality, motherhood, love, and ambition. Like Lydia Davis, Aurelie Sheehan's stories are potent miniatures that blossom out from seemingly insignificant encounters and objects. Jewelry Box is a collection of intimate renderings of the life that surrounds us, just under the surface.
Aurelie Sheehan is author of two novels, History Lesson for Girls and...

History Lesson for Girls by Aurelie Sheehan

In her follow-up to the critically acclaimed novel The Anxiety of Everyday Objects, Aurelie Sheehan presents a moving coming-of-age story set in the disturbingly reckless and often hilariously tacky 1970s. In 1975, Alison Glass, age thirteen, moves to Connecticut with her bohemian parents and her horse, Jazz. Shy, observant, and in a back brace for scoliosis, Alison finds strength in an unlikely friendship with Kate Hamilton, the charismatic but troubled daughter of an egomaniacal New Age guru...

The Fallen Sky by Chris Cokinos

“Christopher Cokinos goes from pole to pole in his search for the bits of cosmos that fall onto the Earth, and the remarkable people who collect and study them. He is a natural philosopher and gifted writer who sprinkles his own kind of stardust on every page. If you have ever wished upon a falling star, this is your chance to know just what is falling, where it comes from, what it tells us about our place in the universe – and what things in life are worth wishing for.”

Chet Raymo, former...

The Computer Culture Reader. Judd Ethan Ruggill, Ken S. McAllister, and Joseph R. Chaney, eds.

The Computer Culture Reader brings together a multi-disciplinary group of scholars to probe the underlying structures and overarching implications of the ways in which people and computers collaborate in the production of meaning. The contributors navigate the heady and sometimes terrifying atmosphere surrounding the digital revolution in an attempt to take its measure through examinations of community and modes of communication, representation, information-production, learning, work, and play...

The Colors of Nature by Alison Deming

The Colors of Nature: Culture, Identity, and the Natural World is an anthology that doesn’t operate merely as a collection of essays and poems by writers of color and their reflections about the natural world. Rather, the anthology is a sophisticated argument expertly structured around the following question: “Why is there so little ‘nature writing’ by people of color?”—Oliver de la Paz

Quartet for the End of Time by Johanna Skibsrud

 
Inspired by and structured around the chamber piece of the same title by the French composer Olivier Messiaen, Quartet for the End of Time is a mesmerizing story of four lives irrevocably linked in a single act of betrayal. The novel takes us on an unforgettable journey beginning during the 1930s Bonus Army riots, when World War I veteran Arthur Sinclair is falsely accused of conspiracy and then disappears. His absence will haunt his son, Douglas, as well as Alden and Sutton Kelly,...

SCISSORS, PAPER, ROCK by Fenton Johnson

“SCISSORS, PAPER, ROCK is a book of insight and honest love; it has the lyricism of family legend, and the dead-on truthful ring of a report from the trenches. Fenton Johnson has made something wonderful here.”

Barbara Kingsolver, author of Pigs in Heaven
 
“The emotional power of SCISSORS, PAPER, ROCK resides on a plot of land in Kentucky…, [It] chronicles the courtships, the births, the deaths and the agonizing disappointments of two generations of the Hardins of Strang Knob…When we first...

Approaches to Teaching Faulkner's As I Lay Dying edited by Lynda Zwinger and Patrick O'Donnell

As I Lay Dying is considered by many both the most enigmatic and the most accessible of Faulkner's major works. This volume of essays, with contributions by Cedric Gael Bryant, Barbara Ladd, John T. Matthews, Homer B. Pettey, and others provides "an aid that should help both new teachers and veterans to teach [As I Lay Dying] more fully and effectively."—Gail L. Mortimer

Geography of the Heart by Fenton Johnson

With grace and affection, Johnson recounts the history of “how I fell in love, how I came to be with someone else, and how he came to death and how I helped, how in the end love enables us to continue beyond death.” At the same time, Johnson interweaves two stories: his own upbringing as the youngest of a Kentucky whiskey maker’s nine children, and that of his lover Larry Rose, the only child of German Jews, survivors of the Holocaust. Johnson’s writing has been described by Barbara Kingsolver...