News & Events

MFA student Nina Boutsikaris was named a finalist in the Tucson Festival of Books Literary Awards!
MFA student Jon Riccio's poem "Fire Escape" was just published online at FORTH.  
Recent MFA graduate Kati Standefer's essay "Wilderness" was a Finalist for the Tucson Festival of Books Literary Award for Creative Nonfiction.
Literature PhD candidate Emily Lyons has been awarded the Spring 2015 Patrick Dissertation Fellowship. "Her dissertation, titled "Visual Authority: Patriarchy, Science, and Imperialism in Nineteenth Century British Literature,"  charts how practices, discourses, and technologies of observation used to enforce the patriarchal-imperialist paradigm are reflected and subverted in nineteenth-century...
Thu, 01/29/2015 - 7:00pm
Tonight at the Poetry Center at 7:00 p.m. we have a very special Prose Series event with author Willy Vlautin, who comes to Tucson from Scappoose, Oregon to read to us from his critically acclaimed novel THE FREE. Please consider joining to hear him read – and he will be doing a lengthy Q&A, which he says is always his favorite part of any appearance. Of THE FREE, Vlautin says, "I...
Thu, 04/16/2015 (All day)
Please save the date for the 27th Annual Arizona Quarterly Symposium on Thursday April 16 through Saturday April 18, 2015, at the Transitional Office Building: 1731 E. Second St. (across from the softball field). The event is free and open to the public. Funded by the Department of English and Arizona Quarterly, A Journal of American Literature, Culture, and Theory. Check http...

Thursday, January 1, 2015

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Jan 29 2015 - 7:00pm to 9:00pm
 
 
 

Bookshelf

Language at Play: Digital Games in Second and Foreign Language Teaching and Learning by Julie M. Sykes and Jonathon Reinhardt

The potential of digital games to inform, enhance, and transform second and foreign language (L2) learning is enormous, but harnessing their potential for application in the L2 classroom presents complex challenges. In Language at Play: Digital Games in Second and Foreign Language Teaching and Learning, Sykes and Reinhardt combine research from a variety of perspectives in applied linguistics, educational gaming, and games studies, and structure their discussion of five major concepts...

Rhetorics of the Americas: 3114 BCE to 2012 CE by Damian Baca

This is the first work to begin to fill a gap: an understanding of discourse aimed to persuade within the Pre-Columbian Americas. The contributors in this collection offer glimpses of what those Indigenous rhetorics might have looked like and how their influences remain. The reader is invited to recognize “the invention of the Americas,” providing other ways to contemplate material life prior to contemporary capitalism, telling us about the global from long ago to current global capitalism....

Crossing the River by Fenton Johnson

THE IDEA PULSED WITH ROMANCE, BUT THE ACT WAS RASH, RECKLESS – AND IRREVOCABLE.
Carrying her Confederate heritage like a flag, Martha Bragg Pickett was as stubborn as her red hair. And hungry for life. On a dare she crossed the river, leaving the safe, abstaining, Baptist, Southern side and venturing over to the dangerous, rowdy, Catholic Northern side. And when that proved less than thrilling, she marched her young self right into the (men only) Miracle Inn, which got a rise...

History Lesson for Girls by Aurelie Sheehan

In her follow-up to the critically acclaimed novel The Anxiety of Everyday Objects, Aurelie Sheehan presents a moving coming-of-age story set in the disturbingly reckless and often hilariously tacky 1970s. In 1975, Alison Glass, age thirteen, moves to Connecticut with her bohemian parents and her horse, Jazz. Shy, observant, and in a back brace for scoliosis, Alison finds strength in an unlikely friendship with Kate Hamilton, the charismatic but troubled daughter of an egomaniacal New Age guru...

Geography of the Heart by Fenton Johnson

With grace and affection, Johnson recounts the history of “how I fell in love, how I came to be with someone else, and how he came to death and how I helped, how in the end love enables us to continue beyond death.” At the same time, Johnson interweaves two stories: his own upbringing as the youngest of a Kentucky whiskey maker’s nine children, and that of his lover Larry Rose, the only child of German Jews, survivors of the Holocaust. Johnson’s writing has been described by Barbara Kingsolver...

Intellectual Resistance and the Struggle for Palestine by Matthew Abraham

"Drawing on the magisterial writings of Edward Said and Franz Fanon, Matthew Abraham has written a brilliant and balanced critique of academic Zionism and a robust defense of Palestinian resistance to Israeli ethnic cleansing." - James Petras, Bartle Professor Emeritus, Binghamton University, USA
 
Intellectual Resistance and the Struggle for Palestine looks at the Question of Palestine as a site of controversy, a place of physical and intellectual repression as well as physical and...

How a Mother Weaned Her Girl from Fairy Tales: and Other Stories by Kate Bernheimer




Elegant and brutal, the stories in Kate Bernheimer's latest collection occupy a heightened landscape, where the familiar cedes to the grotesque and nonsense just as often devolves into terror. These are fairy tales out of time, renewing classic stories we think we know, like one of Bernheimer's girls, whose hands of steel turn to flowers, leaving her beautiful but alone.
Kate Bernheimer is the author of the short story collection Horse, Flower, Bird and the editor of My Mother She Killed Me...

Hope is the Thing with Feathers by Chris Cokinos

A prizewinning poet and nature writer weaves together natural history, biology, sociology, and personal narrative to tell the story of the lives, habitats, and deaths of six extinct bird species.
 
“This story – of the ghost species still haunting this continent – is full of power and mystery.”

Bill McKibben, author of The End of Nature
“I was mesmerized by this fine book and felt in reading these lost natural histories as if I had both been given a gift and had one taken away.”...

Quartet for the End of Time by Johanna Skibsrud

 
Inspired by and structured around the chamber piece of the same title by the French composer Olivier Messiaen, Quartet for the End of Time is a mesmerizing story of four lives irrevocably linked in a single act of betrayal. The novel takes us on an unforgettable journey beginning during the 1930s Bonus Army riots, when World War I veteran Arthur Sinclair is falsely accused of conspiracy and then disappears. His absence will haunt his son, Douglas, as well as Alden and Sutton Kelly,...

The Anxiety of Everyday Objects by Aurelie Sheehan

Excerpt from Chapter One

All good secretaries will eventually find truth in the hearts of men.
Winona Bartlett, Win to her friends, might not have been the world’s best secretary, but her nature was such that serving, subservience, and coffee service came easily, and, in fact, she felt there was an inherent good in doing things well, and this determination more than equaled her actual interest in the long-term prospects at Grecko Mauster Crill. She practiced her secretarial role as a Zen...