News & Events

Forbes Tech: July 29, 2015  In less than two years Slack Technologies has become one of the most glistening of tech’s ten-digit “unicorn” startups, boasting 1.1 million users and a private market valuation of $2.8 billion. If you’ve used Slack’s team-based messaging software, you know that one of its catchiest innovations is Slackbot, a helpful little avatar that pops up periodically to provide...
RCTE PhD student Devon R Kehler's article entitled Tori Amos'(re) sounding and (dis) appearing girls: conceptual and sonic approaches to assembled femininity has been published in Women & Performance: a journal of feminist theory, 2015.
MFA student Will Slattery's essay "Small Spaces" appeared in CutBank's "All Accounts And Mixture" web series.
MFA student Nina Boutsikaris is the non-fiction winner of the 2015 Beacon Street Prize!    

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Bookshelf

The Anxiety of Everyday Objects by Aurelie Sheehan

Excerpt from Chapter One

All good secretaries will eventually find truth in the hearts of men.
Winona Bartlett, Win to her friends, might not have been the world’s best secretary, but her nature was such that serving, subservience, and coffee service came easily, and, in fact, she felt there was an inherent good in doing things well, and this determination more than equaled her actual interest in the long-term prospects at Grecko Mauster Crill. She practiced her secretarial role as a Zen...

Intellectual Resistance and the Struggle for Palestine by Matthew Abraham

"Drawing on the magisterial writings of Edward Said and Franz Fanon, Matthew Abraham has written a brilliant and balanced critique of academic Zionism and a robust defense of Palestinian resistance to Israeli ethnic cleansing." - James Petras, Bartle Professor Emeritus, Binghamton University, USA
 
Intellectual Resistance and the Struggle for Palestine looks at the Question of Palestine as a site of controversy, a place of physical and intellectual repression as well as physical and...

What You See in the Dark by Manuel Muñoz

“You’ll understand one day, her mother had said at the bus station. When you find a man of your own, you’ll know why you’ll run toward him.”
A penetrating look at people searching for meaning and authenticity in lives played out under watchful eyes, this thoroughly original work is intense and fascinating in its juxtapositions of tenderness and menace, violence and regret, and its atmosphere recreation of a place on a brink of change.

Out of Bounds by Matthew Abraham

Academic freedom is a key element of the academic enterprise in the U.S. However, it does not seem to exist when scholars seek to advocate on behalf of Palestinian self-determination.
This unique work examines how the knowledge-power nexus is shaping the discourse around the Israel-Palestine conflict and restricting academic freedom. Beginning with a discussion of American Zionism, the work proceeds to explain why scholars working on the question of Palestine are often denied standard academic...

Rope by Alison Deming

Alison Hawthorne Deming ’s fourth collection of poems follows the paths of imagination into meditations on salt, love, Hurricane Katrina, Greek myth, and the search for extraterrestrial life, all linked by the poet’s faith in art as an instrument for creating meaning, beauty, and continuity—virtues diminished by the velocity and violence of our historical moment. The final long poem “The Flight,” inspired by the works of A. R. Ammons, is a twenty-first century epic poised on the verge of our...

The Available World by Ander Monson

“[Ander Monson’s] poems celebrate defiant excess. In this land of scarcity, right-living involves using up what you have, where you have it; otherwise someone might wreck, steal, or use it and you might not get any. A carpe diem for obscure, doomed youth.”—Stephen Burt

The Making of Barack Obama: The Politics of Persuasion by Matthew Abraham

 “From the inspiring slogans and speeches of his campaign to the eloquent successes and failures of his presidency, Barack Obama has been extravagantly praised and sarcastically criticized for the distinctive power of his rhetoric. The essays in this collection persuasively analyze that rhetoric in all its specific tactics and general strategies, in its idealist yearnings and its pragmatic compromises, in its ambitious strivings and its political obstacles.”
President’s Professor of...

Occupying Our Space by Cristina Devereaux Ramírez

Occupying Our Space sheds a new light on the contributions of Mexican American women journalists and writers during the late nineteenth and early twentieth centuries, marked as the zenith of Mexican journalism.

Jack Kerouac is Pregnant: Stories by Aurelie Sheehan

Excerpt from “Jack Kerouac Is Pregnant”
How to Be a Passenger on a Motorcycle

The motorcycle owner gets on the bike. He’s stomped on the clutch or whatever that thing is, the choke maybe. He dons his big helmet, puts on his big black gloves, lifts his leg over the hulking machine. He situates himself on the seat, revs, adjusts the mirror, and looks at you, standing on the sidewalk like an orphan. You take the cue. You tentatively put on your helmet, a white one unlike his black one, and you’...

Approaches to Teaching Faulkner's As I Lay Dying edited by Lynda Zwinger and Patrick O'Donnell

As I Lay Dying is considered by many both the most enigmatic and the most accessible of Faulkner's major works. This volume of essays, with contributions by Cedric Gael Bryant, Barbara Ladd, John T. Matthews, Homer B. Pettey, and others provides "an aid that should help both new teachers and veterans to teach [As I Lay Dying] more fully and effectively."—Gail L. Mortimer