News & Events

Nina Boutsikaris' (MFA 2015) piece "What Doo Wop Does" is a finalist in the 2014 Mid-American Review Fineline Competition. It will be published in their fall print issue.
Kenny Walker, RCTE Ph.D. student's publication entitled “A Choreography of Living Texts: Selections from the ARST Oral History Project” has been published in Rhetoric Review.  
Jan Bindas-Tenney's essay "How to do Laundry" is forthcoming in Issue #9 of Cactus Heart Press and her essay "Bow Down Bitches" is featured as part of a queer summer web feature in CutBank Literary Magazine's "All Accounts and Mixture"
Alison Hawthorne Deming's new nonfiction book Zoologies: On Animals and Human Spirit will be out in early fall. Essays from the collection are coming out in journals include "Patativa," "Chimera" and "Bobcat" in The Georgia Review;  "The Sacred Pig" in Eleven Eleven; "The Cheetah Run" in terrain.org, "The Pony, The Pig, The Horse" in Ecotone and "...
Fri, 09/05/2014 - 12:00pm
Opening Panel, featuring Lee Medovoi and Charlie Scruggs (English Department) and other faculty. 
Fri, 11/07/2014 - 12:00pm
Fenton Johnson, Dept. of English
 
Fri, 12/05/2014 - 12:00pm
John Warnock, Dept. of English
Johanna Skibsrud, Dept. of English

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Bookshelf

Hemingway and the Black Renaissance ed. by Charles Scruggs and Edward Holcomb

Noted scholars [Holcomb and Scruggs] provide a solid framework for the study of the connections between Hemingway's writing and the literary works of black writers. The collection's unity relies on defining the "Black Renaissance" as encompassing not only the Harlem Renaissance but also teh subsequent advances in black literature sustaned through and beyond the war years, the Black Arts period, and "into the present transnational phase."—Choice Review

Game Work: Language, Power, and Computer Game Culture by Ken S. McAllister

As the popularity of computer games has exploded over the past decade, both scholars and game industry professionals have recognized the necessity of treating games less as frivolous entertainment and more as artifacts of culture worthy of political, social, economic, rhetorical, and aesthetic analysis. Ken McAllister notes in his introduction to Game Work that, even though games are essentially impractical, they are nevertheless important mediating agents for the broad exercise of socio-...

The Making of Barack Obama: The Politics of Persuasion by Matthew Abraham

 “From the inspiring slogans and speeches of his campaign to the eloquent successes and failures of his presidency, Barack Obama has been extravagantly praised and sarcastically criticized for the distinctive power of his rhetoric. The essays in this collection persuasively analyze that rhetoric in all its specific tactics and general strategies, in its idealist yearnings and its pragmatic compromises, in its ambitious strivings and its political obstacles.”
President’s Professor of...

Swamp Isthmus by Joshua Marie Wilkinson

Swamp Isthmus takes the stripped, lyric voice of Selenography, the first book of Wilkinson’s No Volta pentalogy, and confronts a pre-apocalyptic vision of American urban life. Here, the city and forest are one, as are the river and sewer. The ghost and the body are one, and the buildings and the trees, the sidewalks and the switchbacks all fuse. The poems in Swamp Isthmus create the flipside of the pastoral—the urban returns to the rural, their fates...
Jewelry Box by Aurelie Sheehan

 

The sixty-eight short works in this collection (some only a paragraph, others a few pages) straddle memoir and fiction, exploring the nuances of sexuality, motherhood, love, and ambition. Like Lydia Davis, Aurelie Sheehan's stories are potent miniatures that blossom out from seemingly insignificant encounters and objects. Jewelry Box is a collection of intimate renderings of the life that surrounds us, just under the surface.
Aurelie Sheehan is author of two novels, History Lesson for Girls and...

Approaches to Teaching Faulkner's As I Lay Dying edited by Lynda Zwinger and Patrick O'Donnell

As I Lay Dying is considered by many both the most enigmatic and the most accessible of Faulkner's major works. This volume of essays, with contributions by Cedric Gael Bryant, Barbara Ladd, John T. Matthews, Homer B. Pettey, and others provides "an aid that should help both new teachers and veterans to teach [As I Lay Dying] more fully and effectively."—Gail L. Mortimer

The Fallen Sky by Chris Cokinos

“Christopher Cokinos goes from pole to pole in his search for the bits of cosmos that fall onto the Earth, and the remarkable people who collect and study them. He is a natural philosopher and gifted writer who sprinkles his own kind of stardust on every page. If you have ever wished upon a falling star, this is your chance to know just what is falling, where it comes from, what it tells us about our place in the universe – and what things in life are worth wishing for.”

Chet Raymo, former...

Gaming Matters: Art, Science, and Magic and the Computer Game Medium by Judd Ethan Ruggill and Ken S. McAllister

In Gaming Matters, Judd Ethan Ruggill and Ken S. McAllister offer a playful and provocative look at the computer game medium, arguing that games are:

Idiosyncratic, and thus difficult to apprehend using the traditional tools of media study

Irreconcilable, or complex to such a degree that developers, players, and scholars have contradictory ways of describing them

Boring, and therefore obligated to constantly make demands

on players' attention

Anachronistic, or built on age-old...

The Anxiety of Everyday Objects by Aurelie Sheehan

Excerpt from Chapter One

All good secretaries will eventually find truth in the hearts of men.
Winona Bartlett, Win to her friends, might not have been the world’s best secretary, but her nature was such that serving, subservience, and coffee service came easily, and, in fact, she felt there was an inherent good in doing things well, and this determination more than equaled her actual interest in the long-term prospects at Grecko Mauster Crill. She practiced her secretarial role as a Zen...
Fifty leading writers retell myths from around the world in this dazzling follow-up to the bestselling My Mother She Killed Me, My Father He Ate Me.
Icarus flies once more. Aztec jaguar gods again stalk the earth. An American soldier designs a new kind of Trojan horse—his cremains in a bullet. Here, in beguiling guise, are your favorite mythological figures alongside characters from Indian, Punjabi, Inuit, and other traditions.
 Aimee Bender retells the myth of the Titans.
 Madeline Miller...