News & Events

Erin Zwiener has an op-ed up at VIDA: Women in Literary Arts. She also has an essay, "Preconditions for Diplomacy" up at The Toast.
Kati Standefer's interview with MFA alum Rafael de Grenade--titled "Forgetting We Live In the Desert: Rafael de Grenade on tough landscapes, writing as inquiry, and innovating in the face of climate change"-- is now out in the September 15 issue of the High Country News.
 Three poems of MFA student Jon Riccio's, "Gainful," "Dear Identity Thief," and "Logo to Market" appeared in  CutBank.
A well-deserved recognition of Ken McAllister, in this welcome by President Hart! ... an increasing number of UA employees are engaged in the digital humanities movement, one that encourages the expansion and use of technologies like geo-tagging, informatics and augmented realities to enhance student learning and cross-discipline engagement. Advocates include: UA English professor Ken...
Mon, 09/22/2014 - 12:00pm
About Dr. Faisal Devji, St Antony's College
Fri, 10/03/2014 - 12:00pm
1. Professor Maha Nassar, School of Middle Eastern and North African Studies 

Complicated Heroes: Palestinians in Israel and the 1967 Arab Defeat

 

As they sought to comprehend their overwhelming defeat in the 1967 (Six-Day) War with Israel, Arab intellectuals turned to Palestinian citizens of Israel for answers. In particular they lionized the Palestinian “resistance poets,” such as...
Mon, 10/06/2014 - 9:00am
The English Department is a co-sponsor of the upcoming symposium: Digital Literacies In and Beyond the L2 Classroom: A Hybrid Symposium on Research and Practice. Digital poster sessions will be online the week of October 6 - 11, and on October 11 there will be a discussion panel and a keynote on campus. The Symposium is co-directed by ELL Program Director and Associate Professor Jonathon...

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Bookshelf

Jack Kerouac is Pregnant: Stories by Aurelie Sheehan

Excerpt from “Jack Kerouac Is Pregnant”
How to Be a Passenger on a Motorcycle

The motorcycle owner gets on the bike. He’s stomped on the clutch or whatever that thing is, the choke maybe. He dons his big helmet, puts on his big black gloves, lifts his leg over the hulking machine. He situates himself on the seat, revs, adjusts the mirror, and looks at you, standing on the sidewalk like an orphan. You take the cue. You tentatively put on your helmet, a white one unlike his black one, and you’...

Crossing the River by Fenton Johnson

THE IDEA PULSED WITH ROMANCE, BUT THE ACT WAS RASH, RECKLESS – AND IRREVOCABLE.
Carrying her Confederate heritage like a flag, Martha Bragg Pickett was as stubborn as her red hair. And hungry for life. On a dare she crossed the river, leaving the safe, abstaining, Baptist, Southern side and venturing over to the dangerous, rowdy, Catholic Northern side. And when that proved less than thrilling, she marched her young self right into the (men only) Miracle Inn, which got a rise...

Swamp Isthmus by Joshua Marie Wilkinson

Swamp Isthmus takes the stripped, lyric voice of Selenography, the first book of Wilkinson’s No Volta pentalogy, and confronts a pre-apocalyptic vision of American urban life. Here, the city and forest are one, as are the river and sewer. The ghost and the body are one, and the buildings and the trees, the sidewalks and the switchbacks all fuse. The poems in Swamp Isthmus create the flipside of the pastoral—the urban returns to the rural, their fates...
Manuel Muñoz’s stories move beyond traditional themes of Chicano literature to explore conflicts of family, memory, longing, and loss. In the lonely rural towns of California’s Central Valley, his characters struggle to maintain hope and independence in the face of isolation. In the title story, a teenager learns the consequences of succumbing to the lure of a stranger; in another, a young farmworker attempts to hide his supervision of a huddle of children from the police. Bighearted and...

The Computer Culture Reader. Judd Ethan Ruggill, Ken S. McAllister, and Joseph R. Chaney, eds.

The Computer Culture Reader brings together a multi-disciplinary group of scholars to probe the underlying structures and overarching implications of the ways in which people and computers collaborate in the production of meaning. The contributors navigate the heady and sometimes terrifying atmosphere surrounding the digital revolution in an attempt to take its measure through examinations of community and modes of communication, representation, information-production, learning, work, and play...

Hemingway and the Black Renaissance ed. by Charles Scruggs and Edward Holcomb

Noted scholars [Holcomb and Scruggs] provide a solid framework for the study of the connections between Hemingway's writing and the literary works of black writers. The collection's unity relies on defining the "Black Renaissance" as encompassing not only the Harlem Renaissance but also teh subsequent advances in black literature sustaned through and beyond the war years, the Black Arts period, and "into the present transnational phase."—Choice Review
Manuel Muñoz's dazzling second collection finds the author returning, once again, to the small towns of California's Central Valley. Set in a neighborhood with characters whose lives often intersect with each other, The Faith Healer of Olive Avenue offers ten stories about a wide range of lives: a mother coping with a mortally injured son after his motorcycle accident; a single father returning from San Francisco and attempting a reconciliation with an estranged sister; a young woman...

Hope is the Thing with Feathers by Chris Cokinos

A prizewinning poet and nature writer weaves together natural history, biology, sociology, and personal narrative to tell the story of the lives, habitats, and deaths of six extinct bird species.
 
“This story – of the ghost species still haunting this continent – is full of power and mystery.”

Bill McKibben, author of The End of Nature
“I was mesmerized by this fine book and felt in reading these lost natural histories as if I had both been given a gift and had one taken away.”...

SCISSORS, PAPER, ROCK by Fenton Johnson

“SCISSORS, PAPER, ROCK is a book of insight and honest love; it has the lyricism of family legend, and the dead-on truthful ring of a report from the trenches. Fenton Johnson has made something wonderful here.”

Barbara Kingsolver, author of Pigs in Heaven
 
“The emotional power of SCISSORS, PAPER, ROCK resides on a plot of land in Kentucky…, [It] chronicles the courtships, the births, the deaths and the agonizing disappointments of two generations of the Hardins of Strang Knob…When we first...

What You See in the Dark by Manuel Muñoz

“You’ll understand one day, her mother had said at the bus station. When you find a man of your own, you’ll know why you’ll run toward him.”
A penetrating look at people searching for meaning and authenticity in lives played out under watchful eyes, this thoroughly original work is intense and fascinating in its juxtapositions of tenderness and menace, violence and regret, and its atmosphere recreation of a place on a brink of change.