News & Events

Fenton Johnson's essay “Power and Obedience:  Restoring Pacifism to American Politics,” which ran in Appalachian Heritage last spring, has been nominated for a Pushcart Award.  It will be the basis of his First Friday lecture at 1 pm on Friday, November 7, in MLNG 451, as part of the Convergences “War” series.
MFA student Francisco Cantú's Bowden piece went up today at Guernica.  
RCTE professor Adela C. Licona has collaboratively co-authored two community research briefs including LGBTQ Youth of Color: Discipline Disparities, School Push-Out, and the School-to-Prison Pipeline and  Gender Nonconforming Youth: Discipline Disparities, School Push-Out, and the School-to-Prison Pipeline.   Burdge, H., Licona, A. C., Hyemingway, Z. T. (2014). LGBTQ Youth of Color:...
RCTE Alum Susan Meyers is coming out with an academic book and a novel: Del Otro Lado: Literacy and Migration across the U.S.-Mexico Border   Failing the Trapeze (winner of the 2013 Nilsen Literary Prize for first novel)  
Fri, 11/07/2014 - 12:00pm
1. Professor Sonia Shiri, School of Middle Eastern and North African Studies
Revolution in Tunisia: Protest Signs, Graffiti and Facebook
 
2. Professor Fenton Johnson, Dept. of English
Power and Obedience:  Restoring Pacifism to American Politics
Throughout American history, pacifism, though never a majority sentiment, has played a role in shaping national perspectives on war and peace.  But as...
Fri, 12/05/2014 - 12:00pm

1. Professor John Warnock, Dept. of English

"Launch Control"

 

A reading from a piece about a visit in March 2012 to  a Minuteman III Launch Control Center in the missile field outside of F. E. Warren Air Force Base in Cheyenne, Wyoming

 

2. Professor Johanna Skibsrud, Dept. of English
"If I Were Human: Reflections on 100 Years of War"
Thu, 04/16/2015 (All day)
Please save the date for the 27th Annual Arizona Quarterly Symposium on Thursday April 16 through Saturday April 18, 2015, at the Transitional Office Building: 1731 E. Second St. (across from the softball field). The event is free and open to the public. Funded by the Department of English and Arizona Quarterly, A Journal of American Literature, Culture, and Theory. Check http...

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Digital Literacies Symposium Oct 6 2014 - 9:00am to Oct 11 2014 - 6:00pm
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
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Bookshelf

The Available World by Ander Monson

“[Ander Monson’s] poems celebrate defiant excess. In this land of scarcity, right-living involves using up what you have, where you have it; otherwise someone might wreck, steal, or use it and you might not get any. A carpe diem for obscure, doomed youth.”—Stephen Burt

Game Work: Language, Power, and Computer Game Culture by Ken S. McAllister

As the popularity of computer games has exploded over the past decade, both scholars and game industry professionals have recognized the necessity of treating games less as frivolous entertainment and more as artifacts of culture worthy of political, social, economic, rhetorical, and aesthetic analysis. Ken McAllister notes in his introduction to Game Work that, even though games are essentially impractical, they are nevertheless important mediating agents for the broad exercise of socio-...
Manuel Muñoz’s stories move beyond traditional themes of Chicano literature to explore conflicts of family, memory, longing, and loss. In the lonely rural towns of California’s Central Valley, his characters struggle to maintain hope and independence in the face of isolation. In the title story, a teenager learns the consequences of succumbing to the lure of a stranger; in another, a young farmworker attempts to hide his supervision of a huddle of children from the police. Bighearted and...

Intellectual Resistance and the Struggle for Palestine by Matthew Abraham

"Drawing on the magisterial writings of Edward Said and Franz Fanon, Matthew Abraham has written a brilliant and balanced critique of academic Zionism and a robust defense of Palestinian resistance to Israeli ethnic cleansing." - James Petras, Bartle Professor Emeritus, Binghamton University, USA
 
Intellectual Resistance and the Struggle for Palestine looks at the Question of Palestine as a site of controversy, a place of physical and intellectual repression as well as physical and...

The Colors of Nature by Alison Deming

The Colors of Nature: Culture, Identity, and the Natural World is an anthology that doesn’t operate merely as a collection of essays and poems by writers of color and their reflections about the natural world. Rather, the anthology is a sophisticated argument expertly structured around the following question: “Why is there so little ‘nature writing’ by people of color?”—Oliver de la Paz

Rhetorics of the Americas: 3114 BCE to 2012 CE by Damian Baca

This is the first work to begin to fill a gap: an understanding of discourse aimed to persuade within the Pre-Columbian Americas. The contributors in this collection offer glimpses of what those Indigenous rhetorics might have looked like and how their influences remain. The reader is invited to recognize “the invention of the Americas,” providing other ways to contemplate material life prior to contemporary capitalism, telling us about the global from long ago to current global capitalism....

How a Mother Weaned Her Girl from Fairy Tales: and Other Stories by Kate Bernheimer




Elegant and brutal, the stories in Kate Bernheimer's latest collection occupy a heightened landscape, where the familiar cedes to the grotesque and nonsense just as often devolves into terror. These are fairy tales out of time, renewing classic stories we think we know, like one of Bernheimer's girls, whose hands of steel turn to flowers, leaving her beautiful but alone.
Kate Bernheimer is the author of the short story collection Horse, Flower, Bird and the editor of My Mother She Killed Me...

Geography of the Heart by Fenton Johnson

With grace and affection, Johnson recounts the history of “how I fell in love, how I came to be with someone else, and how he came to death and how I helped, how in the end love enables us to continue beyond death.” At the same time, Johnson interweaves two stories: his own upbringing as the youngest of a Kentucky whiskey maker’s nine children, and that of his lover Larry Rose, the only child of German Jews, survivors of the Holocaust. Johnson’s writing has been described by Barbara Kingsolver...

The Anxiety of Everyday Objects by Aurelie Sheehan

Excerpt from Chapter One

All good secretaries will eventually find truth in the hearts of men.
Winona Bartlett, Win to her friends, might not have been the world’s best secretary, but her nature was such that serving, subservience, and coffee service came easily, and, in fact, she felt there was an inherent good in doing things well, and this determination more than equaled her actual interest in the long-term prospects at Grecko Mauster Crill. She practiced her secretarial role as a Zen...

Crossing the River by Fenton Johnson

THE IDEA PULSED WITH ROMANCE, BUT THE ACT WAS RASH, RECKLESS – AND IRREVOCABLE.
Carrying her Confederate heritage like a flag, Martha Bragg Pickett was as stubborn as her red hair. And hungry for life. On a dare she crossed the river, leaving the safe, abstaining, Baptist, Southern side and venturing over to the dangerous, rowdy, Catholic Northern side. And when that proved less than thrilling, she marched her young self right into the (men only) Miracle Inn, which got a rise...