News & Events

RCTE researchers Ken McAllister, Lizzy Bentley, Kate Chaterdon, José Cortez, Maggie Melo, and COH Dean Mary Wildner-Bassett have received an Innovative Learning Project Catalyst Grant to develop a set of tools and curriculum around Focused Associational Thinking (FAT). They will be working to determine if FAT may be deployed in educational contexts where course success is expected to closely...
RCTE professor John Warnock had a featured op-ed entitled “Ode to Rancho Santa Catalina” in the March 20th issue of the Arizona Daily Star.
RCTE PhD student Daniel Bernal has been accepted to present "Meta-Genre for the Meta-Major: Sustaining FYC in a Specializing Academy: at the Council of Writing Program Administrators (CWPA) conference in Idaho this summer.  
RCTE PhD student Kristin Winet's technical writing classes and her community partnership with Lee Bucyk from the Hermitage Cat Shelter were featured in KVOA News 4 Tucson on April 1, 2015. The newsroom followed her students throughout the semester as they worked on their projects and the segment emphasized relationships between academic writers and local community outrach.

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Arizona Quarterly Symposium Apr 16 2015 (All day) to Apr 18 2015 (All day)
 
 
 
 
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Bookshelf

A Palace of Pearls by Jane Miller

In this book-length sequence, animated by a confrontation with her dead father, Jane Miller meditates on home, love, war and the responsibility of the poet. A Palace of Pearls is inspired by one of the most spectacular civilizations in history, the Arab kingdom of Al-Andalus—a Middle Age civilization where architecture, science and art flourished and Christians, Jews, and Muslims lived in relative harmony. The reader roams through "rooms," encountering Greek, Judaic, and Roman mythology, and...

What You See in the Dark by Manuel Muñoz

“You’ll understand one day, her mother had said at the bus station. When you find a man of your own, you’ll know why you’ll run toward him.”
A penetrating look at people searching for meaning and authenticity in lives played out under watchful eyes, this thoroughly original work is intense and fascinating in its juxtapositions of tenderness and menace, violence and regret, and its atmosphere recreation of a place on a brink of change.

Ground|Water. The Art, Design and Science of a Dry River

Ellen McMahon, Ander Monson, Beth Weinstein Eds.

Ground|Water is an ode to a dry river, the kind of river most familiar to those who dwell in Southern Arizona. It is also an experiment in making something beautiful from something that has been desecrated. And it is a strong message about community and responsibility.

AZ 100 Indie Films: A State of Arizona Centennial Celebration by Judd Ethan Ruggill, Ken S. McAllister

A catalog of the 100 films selected by the Arizona Media Arts Center to celebrate the 2012 Centennial of Arizona statehood. Includes copious film and filmmaker information, a guide to film themes for teachers and scholars, and a still from each film. Black & White with Color cover. 200 pages.

My Mother She Killed Me, My Father He ate Me: Forty New Fairy Tales edited by Kate Bernheimer

Props? Already on the ready. The slipper, the spindle, the seashell, the sword. The coach, the comb, the cauldron, the cape. The apple, the bread, and the porridge. And look, even simpler things in the dusty shadows, from earier iterations of these tales. The feather, the stone, the bucket of water; the knife, the bone, the bucket of blood. —from the foreword by Gregory Maguire
Contributors to this anthology include Kim Addonizio, Neil Gaiman, Hiromi Itō, Ilya Kaminsky, Jonathan Keats, Lydia...

How a Mother Weaned Her Girl from Fairy Tales: and Other Stories by Kate Bernheimer




Elegant and brutal, the stories in Kate Bernheimer's latest collection occupy a heightened landscape, where the familiar cedes to the grotesque and nonsense just as often devolves into terror. These are fairy tales out of time, renewing classic stories we think we know, like one of Bernheimer's girls, whose hands of steel turn to flowers, leaving her beautiful but alone.
Kate Bernheimer is the author of the short story collection Horse, Flower, Bird and the editor of My Mother She Killed Me...

The Computer Culture Reader. Judd Ethan Ruggill, Ken S. McAllister, and Joseph R. Chaney, eds.

The Computer Culture Reader brings together a multi-disciplinary group of scholars to probe the underlying structures and overarching implications of the ways in which people and computers collaborate in the production of meaning. The contributors navigate the heady and sometimes terrifying atmosphere surrounding the digital revolution in an attempt to take its measure through examinations of community and modes of communication, representation, information-production, learning, work, and play...

Swamp Isthmus by Joshua Marie Wilkinson

Swamp Isthmus takes the stripped, lyric voice of Selenography, the first book of Wilkinson’s No Volta pentalogy, and confronts a pre-apocalyptic vision of American urban life. Here, the city and forest are one, as are the river and sewer. The ghost and the body are one, and the buildings and the trees, the sidewalks and the switchbacks all fuse. The poems in Swamp Isthmus create the flipside of the pastoral—the urban returns to the rural, their fates...

Language at Play: Digital Games in Second and Foreign Language Teaching and Learning by Julie M. Sykes and Jonathon Reinhardt

The potential of digital games to inform, enhance, and transform second and foreign language (L2) learning is enormous, but harnessing their potential for application in the L2 classroom presents complex challenges. In Language at Play: Digital Games in Second and Foreign Language Teaching and Learning, Sykes and Reinhardt combine research from a variety of perspectives in applied linguistics, educational gaming, and games studies, and structure their discussion of five major concepts...

Crossing the River by Fenton Johnson

THE IDEA PULSED WITH ROMANCE, BUT THE ACT WAS RASH, RECKLESS – AND IRREVOCABLE.
Carrying her Confederate heritage like a flag, Martha Bragg Pickett was as stubborn as her red hair. And hungry for life. On a dare she crossed the river, leaving the safe, abstaining, Baptist, Southern side and venturing over to the dangerous, rowdy, Catholic Northern side. And when that proved less than thrilling, she marched her young self right into the (men only) Miracle Inn, which got a rise...