News & Events

Erin Zwiener has an op-ed up at VIDA: Women in Literary Arts. She also has an essay, "Preconditions for Diplomacy" up at The Toast.
Kati Standefer's interview with MFA alum Rafael de Grenade--titled "Forgetting We Live In the Desert: Rafael de Grenade on tough landscapes, writing as inquiry, and innovating in the face of climate change"-- is now out in the September 15 issue of the High Country News.
 Three poems of MFA student Jon Riccio's, "Gainful," "Dear Identity Thief," and "Logo to Market" appeared in  CutBank.
A well-deserved recognition of Ken McAllister, in this welcome by President Hart! ... an increasing number of UA employees are engaged in the digital humanities movement, one that encourages the expansion and use of technologies like geo-tagging, informatics and augmented realities to enhance student learning and cross-discipline engagement. Advocates include: UA English professor Ken...
Mon, 09/22/2014 - 12:00pm
About Dr. Faisal Devji, St Antony's College
Fri, 10/03/2014 - 12:00pm
1. Professor Maha Nassar, School of Middle Eastern and North African Studies 

Complicated Heroes: Palestinians in Israel and the 1967 Arab Defeat

 

As they sought to comprehend their overwhelming defeat in the 1967 (Six-Day) War with Israel, Arab intellectuals turned to Palestinian citizens of Israel for answers. In particular they lionized the Palestinian “resistance poets,” such as...
Mon, 10/06/2014 - 9:00am
The English Department is a co-sponsor of the upcoming symposium: Digital Literacies In and Beyond the L2 Classroom: A Hybrid Symposium on Research and Practice. Digital poster sessions will be online the week of October 6 - 11, and on October 11 there will be a discussion panel and a keynote on campus. The Symposium is co-directed by ELL Program Director and Associate Professor Jonathon...

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Bookshelf

The Fallen Sky by Chris Cokinos

“Christopher Cokinos goes from pole to pole in his search for the bits of cosmos that fall onto the Earth, and the remarkable people who collect and study them. He is a natural philosopher and gifted writer who sprinkles his own kind of stardust on every page. If you have ever wished upon a falling star, this is your chance to know just what is falling, where it comes from, what it tells us about our place in the universe – and what things in life are worth wishing for.”

Chet Raymo, former...

How a Mother Weaned Her Girl from Fairy Tales: and Other Stories by Kate Bernheimer




Elegant and brutal, the stories in Kate Bernheimer's latest collection occupy a heightened landscape, where the familiar cedes to the grotesque and nonsense just as often devolves into terror. These are fairy tales out of time, renewing classic stories we think we know, like one of Bernheimer's girls, whose hands of steel turn to flowers, leaving her beautiful but alone.
Kate Bernheimer is the author of the short story collection Horse, Flower, Bird and the editor of My Mother She Killed Me...

Hemingway and the Black Renaissance ed. by Charles Scruggs and Edward Holcomb

Noted scholars [Holcomb and Scruggs] provide a solid framework for the study of the connections between Hemingway's writing and the literary works of black writers. The collection's unity relies on defining the "Black Renaissance" as encompassing not only the Harlem Renaissance but also teh subsequent advances in black literature sustaned through and beyond the war years, the Black Arts period, and "into the present transnational phase."—Choice Review

History Lesson for Girls by Aurelie Sheehan

In her follow-up to the critically acclaimed novel The Anxiety of Everyday Objects, Aurelie Sheehan presents a moving coming-of-age story set in the disturbingly reckless and often hilariously tacky 1970s. In 1975, Alison Glass, age thirteen, moves to Connecticut with her bohemian parents and her horse, Jazz. Shy, observant, and in a back brace for scoliosis, Alison finds strength in an unlikely friendship with Kate Hamilton, the charismatic but troubled daughter of an egomaniacal New Age guru...

Crossing the River by Fenton Johnson

THE IDEA PULSED WITH ROMANCE, BUT THE ACT WAS RASH, RECKLESS – AND IRREVOCABLE.
Carrying her Confederate heritage like a flag, Martha Bragg Pickett was as stubborn as her red hair. And hungry for life. On a dare she crossed the river, leaving the safe, abstaining, Baptist, Southern side and venturing over to the dangerous, rowdy, Catholic Northern side. And when that proved less than thrilling, she marched her young self right into the (men only) Miracle Inn, which got a rise...

Vanishing Point by Ander Monson

In contemporary America, land of tell-all memoirs and endless reality television, what kind of person denies the opportunity to present himself in his own voice, to lead with “I”? How many layers of a life can be peeled back before the self vanishes?
In this provocative, witty series of meditations, Ander Monson faces down the idea of the memoir, grappling with the lure of self-interest and self-presentation. While setting out to describe the experience of serving as head juror at the trial of...

Jack Kerouac is Pregnant: Stories by Aurelie Sheehan

Excerpt from “Jack Kerouac Is Pregnant”
How to Be a Passenger on a Motorcycle

The motorcycle owner gets on the bike. He’s stomped on the clutch or whatever that thing is, the choke maybe. He dons his big helmet, puts on his big black gloves, lifts his leg over the hulking machine. He situates himself on the seat, revs, adjusts the mirror, and looks at you, standing on the sidewalk like an orphan. You take the cue. You tentatively put on your helmet, a white one unlike his black one, and you’...

Game Work: Language, Power, and Computer Game Culture by Ken S. McAllister

As the popularity of computer games has exploded over the past decade, both scholars and game industry professionals have recognized the necessity of treating games less as frivolous entertainment and more as artifacts of culture worthy of political, social, economic, rhetorical, and aesthetic analysis. Ken McAllister notes in his introduction to Game Work that, even though games are essentially impractical, they are nevertheless important mediating agents for the broad exercise of socio-...

Geography of the Heart by Fenton Johnson

With grace and affection, Johnson recounts the history of “how I fell in love, how I came to be with someone else, and how he came to death and how I helped, how in the end love enables us to continue beyond death.” At the same time, Johnson interweaves two stories: his own upbringing as the youngest of a Kentucky whiskey maker’s nine children, and that of his lover Larry Rose, the only child of German Jews, survivors of the Holocaust. Johnson’s writing has been described by Barbara Kingsolver...

Grounds of Literary Criticism by Suresh Raval

Between the foundationalist stance that seeks to eliminate disputes by finding the right answers and the relativist postion that regards disagreements as pointless quarrels that can never be resolved, Suresh Raval advocates a refreshing new perspective: a rehabilitation of controversy that recognizes the essentially contestable nature of critical concepts.
Proposing an antifoundationalist exploration of the problems of literary criticism and theory, Raval argues that critical debates, though...