Summer 2018 Course Descriptions

Pre-Session Courses (5/14/2018-6/2/2018)

Summer Session 1 courses (6/4/2018-7/5/2018)

Summer Session 2 courses (7/9/2018-8/8/2018)

Seven Week 2 (UG) courses (7/2/2018-8/17/2018)

Professional Techcnical Writing Courses (All)

________________________________________________________________________________________________________________

PRE-Session Courses

ENGL 215-131              Elements of Craft/Creative Writing          Instructor: Wilson

  •  Fully online

Elements of Craft is a reading and discussion course designed to introduce new or potential creative writing majors/minors to essential terms and concepts across three genres (fiction, creative nonfiction, and poetry). We’ll read a range of contemporary authors who are using traditional and innovative formal approaches in their respective genres, as well as do creative writing exercises and reflective writing about literary craft.

ENGL 380-101          Literary Analysis     Instructor: Nathanson

  • Fully online

This is a course in “close reading.” The reading assignments will be short, to allow us to pay close attention to individual texts and individual passages. We’ll read many poems and some short stories, with an eye toward mastering the close reading techniques crucial to the sort of literary analysis we practice in upper-division literature courses (and beyond). For this online course, daily participation in discussion boards will be a major course requirement. Students will also write approximately eight short exercises (roughly 1 page each) and two papers (roughly 3-4 pages each). There are no exams.

There’s no booklist for this course. All course materials will be available online.

Questions? Please email the instructor at nathanso@email.arizona.edu

Five-Week First Courses

ENGL 201-101          Introduction to Creative Writing Nonfiction    Instructor: ROLSTON

  • M-F 9:00-10:45 a.m.

This course is intended to give students a practical understanding of beginning techniques of nonfiction writing, taught through exercises, the writing of original nonfiction, and readings in contemporary nonfiction.  The course complements existing courses in poetry (ENGL209) and fiction (ENGL210).  All three courses are intended to improve undergraduate education by providing contact hours with Creative Writing faculty members early in the undergraduate's course of study.

ENGL 209-001          Introduction to Writing Poetry    Instructor: TERAZAWA

  • M-F 1:00-2:45 p.m.

Beginning techniques of poetry writing, taught through exercises, the writing of original poetry, and readings in contemporary poetry.

ENGL 210-101          Introduction to the Writing of Fiction     Instructor: AGRAWAL

  • Fully online

Beginning techniques of fiction writing, taught through exercises, the writing of original fiction, and readings in contemporary fiction.

ENGL 260-001       Major British Writers               Instructor: CHABKO

  • M-F    11:00-12:45 p.m.

The purpose of this course will be to examine selected works by major British writers from the 19th century to the present. The list of the texts that will be studied has been compiled with reference to the three conventions which are dominant in the history of the English novel, i.e., realism, modernism and postmodernism. While such a clear-cut distinction between the literary conventions is problematic, the works included in the reading list dovetail, either thematically or formally (or both), with what many literary critics claim as the criteria for differentiating between these three narrative modes. The reading list is primarily concerned with the genre of the novel; however, students will be also asked to read selected works of poetry and non-fiction from major writers from within each literary period. We will read works of such prominent novelists and literary critics as Charles Dickens, Emily Brontë, George Eliot, Oscar Wilde, Henry James, Joseph Conrad, T.S. Eliot, James Joyce, Virginia Woolf, Bertrand Russell, Aldous Huxley, Graham Greene, William Golding, and John Fowles. We will also look at selected film adaptations and plays. By surveying the works included in the reading list from the perspective of these three shifts of emphasis between literature’s representation of man’s dealing with social reality (realism), his/her consciousness (modernism) and with man-made artifacts (postmodernism), the students will become familiar with the development of British literature from the 19th century to the present as well as social and cultural forces that contributed to the course this development has taken.

ENGL 280-001               Introduction to Literature           Instructor: STAFF

  • M-F  3:00-4:45 p.m.
Close reading of literary texts, critical analysis, and articulation of intellectually challenging ideas in clear prose.

ENGL 300-101     Literature and Film                Instructor: FARRIOR

  • Fully Online
  • Modern/Contemporary

Comparative study of literature and cinema as aesthetic media.

ENGL 310   Studies in Genres 
  • 101      Instructor: Abraham
  • Fully Online
  • Modern/Contemporary

This course will explore the emerging genre of autobiography associated with explorations of populist anger, political resentment, sexual desire, familial and non-familial connections, and personal growth. We will read the following fictional and non-fictional works: J.D. Vance’s Hillbilly Elegy: A Memoir of a Family and Culture in Crisis, Claire Dederer’s Love and Trouble: A Midlife Reckoning, Rachel Cusk’s Outline: A Novel, and Khaled Hosseini’s And the Mountains Echoed. The course will introduce students to how the autobiographical genre creates conceptions of agency and personhood, in various life contexts. Students will write two short course papers during the summer session, in addition to writing D2L discussion posts in response to instructor and classmate prompts.

  • 102      Instructor: Zwinger
  • Fully Online
  • Modern/Contemporary

This is a fully online course on perhaps the most popular modern fiction version of the epic genre, George R.R Martin’s novel series, A Song of Ice and Fire, known popularly by the title of the first novel in the 5-novel sequence, A Game of Thrones. We will read the novels intensively and consider their historical roots in the epic, their status as cultural event across many readerships, and our own participation in epic fantasy fiction as absorbed readers.Your work will include extensive daily reading, guided daily discussion posts, and two informal papers.

ENGL 373A-101           British and American Literature: Beowulf-1660                 Instructor: Mason

  • Fully Online
A survey of British and American literature to 1660, with emphasis on major writers in their literary and historical contexts.

ENGL 396A-101           Junior Proseminar          Instructor: Staff

  • Fully Online

This junior-level proseminar introduces students to methods and materials of literary research.  Content of individual seminars will vary, based upon instructor.

Five-Week Second Courses

ENGL 248B-101  Introduction to Fairy Tales     Instructor: Zwinger

  • Fully Online

So many of us grew up on Disney's version of fairy tales; they are a part of people's childhoods and in fact are enjoyed by people well beyond their early years. Beautiful, witty, and timeless, for many people Disney means fairy tales. But fairy tales are very old forms of narrative entertainment, with some of them harking back to even older forms.And the older versions do not limit themselves to princesses in blue ball gowns and gruff but ultimately good-hearted bad guys.  In this section of "Introduction to Fairy Tales," we will view some of the iconic Disney versions of fairy tales, read the tales on which they are based, and think about what cultural and personal role these apparently deathless tales play, then and now. Work will consist of informal daily writing assignments responding to online discussion topics and two informal essays.

ENGL 263-101    Topics in Children’s Literature: Children’s Literature Through the Ages      Instructor: Pearmain

  • Fully Online

From the “origins” of Children’s Literature to the current day call for diverse voices in the genre, this course examines the development of concepts of the child, children’s literature, and Western Culture. We will read a broad spectrum of historical and contemporary U.S., British, and world literature, and works representing a variety of genres and cultures. Through a survey of folk tales, picture books, middle grade novels, young adult novels, and graphic novels, we will consider the historical development of children’s literature as well as its dual agenda of instruction and amusement.

ENGL 265             Major  American Writers        Instructor: Thomas

  • 265-001     M-F 1:00 p.m.-2:45 p.m.

This section of Major American Writers will consist of four units. The course will begin with an intensive study of some of the American authors featured in D. H. Lawrence’s 1923 work of literary criticism, Studies in Classic American Literature. With Lawrence’s work in mind, students will think about the traces of British and European influence in works of American literature and what this influence means for or does to American writers. As an informally exiled, controversial British writer who lived for some time in New Mexico, Lawrence’s voice provides a particularly exciting model for thinking about how influence operates in works of American literature. We will read mostly short works by the following American writers: Herman Melville, Nathaniel Hawthorne, Edgar Allan Poe, Ralph Waldo Emerson, Walt Whitman, Kate Chopin, Henry James, Willa Cather, T.S. Eliot, Langston Hughes, Gwendolyn Brooks, Hart Crane, Nella Larsen, James Baldwin, Tennessee Williams, Truman Capote, Norman Mailer, Yoko Ono, Leslie Marmon Silko, and Patti Smith.

Students will write 2 short papers for each unit in which they close read passages from one of the assigned texts. They will also be asked to write their own discussion posts and respond to classmates’ posts for each reading. In addition, there will be a final reflection in which students synthesize what they’ve learned. Both creative and traditional approaches to this final assignment are welcome. Throughout the course, students will be encouraged to read closely and to translate these close readings into more formal literary analysis. Students will also begin to think about the differences and similarities between American and British works of literature, as well as what makes a work canonical (or not).

ENGL 280-101               Introduction to Literature           Instructor: COONS

  • Fully Online

In this course, we’ll consider how literature represents, enriches, defamiliarizes, resists, and transforms something called “reality.” We’ll ask: what’s so interesting about the everyday lives of imaginary others? What do these narratives reveal about the self, social relations, the workings of power? How do realist and speculative fictions help us learn to inhabit a world we need, and need to challenge? Along the way, we’ll develop core analytical skills in close reading and evidence-based argumentation. Readings TBD, but will likely include George Eliot, Henry James, Virginia Woolf, and Kazuo Ishiguro. You’ll be responsible for completing weekly close reading assignments, participating in online discussion, and composing a final essay that expands on one of your close readings.

ENGL 300-001     Literature and Film                Instructor: SALZER

  • M-F  3:00-4:45 p.m.
  • Modern/Contemporary

This course will focus on paranoia in American literature and film. We will look at the traditions of noir, science fiction, and postmodernism as different but interrelated reflections of American paranoia. Often, our texts will be haunted by the horrors of America’s past, and/or obsessed with an irrepressible feeling that mysterious forces are lurking right on the edge of perception. Through our discussions, we’ll consider both how paranoia relates to American-ness, and how 20th century texts and films dealing with paranoia form a conspiratorial tradition of their own. We won’t have time for all of them, but here are some likely authors/directors: Dashiell Hammett, Patricia Highsmith, Jacques Tourneur, Philip K. Dick, Octavia Butler, Terry Gilliam, Thomas Pynchon, Kathy Acker, Paul Thomas Anderson, Ishmael Reed, and David Lynch. One of the films we watch will be decided by a student vote. Students will be responsible for short weekly writing assignments, lively in-class discussion, and a paper at the end of the class. No exams.

ENGL373B   British and American Literature: Restoration through 19th Century      Instructor: Sims

  • 373B-101    Fully Online
A survey of British and American literature from 1660 to the Victorian period, with emphasis on major writers in their literary and historical contexts.

Seven Week-Second Courses

 
ENGL 355   English Sociolinguistics                Instructor: Slinkard
  • Fully Online

Study of English form and use in relation to social and cultural contexts. Topics include regional and social dialectology, attitudes toward variation and change, strategies of interaction, gender and language use, and politeness, power and politics.

Professional Technical Writing Courses                                                                       ***Certificate Information***

**PTW Five-Week First Courses**

ENGL 307-001     Professional Writing                Instructor: Staff

  • M-F 9:00-10:45 a.m.

Practice in writing business letters, reports and proposals.

ENGL 308     Technical Writing             Instructor: Staff

  • 001 M-F 1:00-2:15 p.m.
  • 002M-F  3:00-4:45 p.m.

Analysis and presentation of scientific and technical information.

**Seven Week-First Courses**

ENGL 307       Professional Writing              Instructor: Staff

  • 101  Fully Online
  • 102  Fully Online
  • 103  Fully Online

This course emphasizes communication in professional contexts. You will learn strategies for and get practice in using writing and other design elements to communicate effectively and ethically for professional audiences. This course is part of the Professional and Technical Writing Certificate, and at the end of the course you will build a portfolio that you can draw on for the certificate completion portfolio. This course also uses the same textbook bundle as ENGL 313 and 308 (also part of the certificate), which means you can complete the certificate using just one textbook bundle.

ENGL 308     Technical Writing            Instructor: Staff

  • 101  Fully Online
  • 102  Fully Online

This course emphasizes analyzing and communicating technical knowledge. You will learn strategies for and get practice in researching, documenting, and reporting technical information effectively and ethically for specific audiences. This course is part of the Professional and Technical Writing Certificate, and at the end of the course you will build a portfolio that you can draw on for the certificate completion portfolio. This course also uses the same textbook bundle as ENGL 313 and 307 (also part of the certificate), which means you can complete the certificate using just one textbook bundle.

ENGL 313  Introduction to Professional & Technical Writing                     Instructor: Staff

  • 101  Fully Online

This course introduces key concepts and practices of professional and technical writing. You will learn strategies for and get practice in writing effectively for specific audiences and contexts. This course is part of the Professional and Technical Writing Certificate, and at the end of the course you will build a portfolio that you can draw on for the certificate completion portfolio. This course also uses the same textbook bundle as ENGL 307 and 308 (also part of the certificate), which means you can complete the certificate using just one textbook bundle.

ENGL 414   Advanced Scientific Writing               Instructor: Shivers-McNair

  • 101  Fully Online

This course emphasizes communicating scientific and technical knowledge. You will learn strategies for and get practice in developing, testing, and delivering scientific and technical reports for specific audiences. Whether you bring a project to the class or develop a project for the purpose of the class, you will have opportunities to get feedback on your project in various stages of preparation. This course counts as an elective for the undergraduate Professional and Technical Writing Certificate.

**Seven Week-Second Courses**

ENGL 307       Professional Writing              Instructor: Staff

  • 103  Fully Online
  • 104  Fully Online
  • 105  Fully Online

This course emphasizes communication in professional contexts. You will learn strategies for and get practice in using writing and other design elements to communicate effectively and ethically for professional audiences. This course is part of the Professional and Technical Writing Certificate, and at the end of the course you will build a portfolio that you can draw on for the certificate completion portfolio. This course also uses the same textbook bundle as ENGL 313 and 308 (also part of the certificate), which means you can complete the certificate using just one textbook bundle.

ENGL 308     Technical Writing            Instructor: Staff

  • 104  Fully Online
  • 105  Fully Online
  • 106  Fully Online

This course emphasizes analyzing and communicating technical knowledge. You will learn strategies for and get practice in researching, documenting, and reporting technical information effectively and ethically for specific audiences. This course is part of the Professional and Technical Writing Certificate, and at the end of the course you will build a portfolio that you can draw on for the certificate completion portfolio. This course also uses the same textbook bundle as ENGL 313 and 307 (also part of the certificate), which means you can complete the certificate using just one textbook bundle.

ENGL 494P   Portfolios in Professional and Technical Writing             Instructor: Staff

  • 101  Fully Online

Students will explore the theories and practices of professional and academic portfolios while simultaneously designing and developing an adaptive identity and a professional persona for post-graduate settings. Students will synthesize work from past and present courses and experiences. They will make complex composition decisions about content, design, structure, and media of their portfolios in connection with identifiable elements of a given rhetorical situation. Students will discuss and apply legal and ethical issues related to portfolio development and publication of 21st century digital identities.

College of Social and Behavioral Sciences