Student Spotlights

“My experience with the English Department was wonderful. I especially appreciated the fantastic professors available at all levels of the major.” 

“Teachers who cared about my success and peers who pushed me to improve are the things I remember most about the English Department.”

“I think that students should come away from their English major with a strong sense of the historical depth of the language and literary tradition.”

“The professors in the Creative Non-fiction focus were incredible. Survey courses were wonderful as well.” 

“The Honors Program in English was also incredibly important to my graduate studies (and likely my future career).” 

I first met Florian while working on the StudyinBC video series. Even before hitting record on the camera, he started our conversation with a smile. With so much charisma and energy, it’s no wonder this Grade 10 student from Germany plans to study art and performance.

"I'm here because I love people. I can't stop talking about the people,” says Florian, a Grade 10 student from Germany.

Leslie Scalapino (July 25, 1944 – May 28, 2010) was a United States poet, experimental prose writer, playwright, essayist, and editor, sometimes grouped in with the Language poets, though she felt closely tied to the Beat poets.[1] A longtime resident of California's Bay Area, she earned an M.A. in English from the University of California at Berkeley. Among her works, Scalapino is the author of way (North Point Press, 1988), a long poem which won the Poetry Center Award, the Lawrence Lipton Prize, and the American Book Award.

I always knew I wanted to be a writer, but I never knew what I wanted to write about until I read Michael Pollan’s The Omnivore’s Dilemma. Reading the clear, articulate, persuasive prose, laughing at the skillfully incorporated anecdotes, I began to care passionately about environmental consciousness and human food systems, and I wanted to write like that. A new world opened up to me—one where my actions and the actions of others mattered, where life was full of choices, and most importantly, where I could influence peoples’ choices through writing.


When I was 18 I took a trip led by a junior English teacher from my high school. Beginning in Italy, we toured through Austria, Germany, and Switzerland. For three days we stayed in a hostel in the Swiss Alps outside of Gimmelwald, a small and not particularly popular tourist destination.

Sometimes, I think people see galaxies colliding around my head. Sometimes, I think galaxies are colliding inside my head. In about 4 billion years, the Milky Way, Andromeda, and possibly Triangulum galaxies will collide—out in real space. It will look like pure chaos; stars will be thrown out of orbit, and the Earth’s position will be pushed even farther from the galactic center as these systems merge. This impending event is kind of like the struggle within my head—it’s how I’ve chosen to visualize my life.



College of Social and Behavioral Sciences