News & Events

MFA student Jan Bindas-Tenney's essay "Paper Mill is Something Not Heard" will appear in Issue 30, Spring 2015 of Arts & Letters. She also  received an honorable mention in the AWP Intro Journals Award for her essay "No-See-Ums"!
RCTE Assistant Professor Cristina D. Ramírez was awarded the Provost Author Support for her forthcoming book, Occupying Our Space: The Rhetoric of Mexican Women Journalists and Activists, 1875-1942.  These funds support publications of high scholarly promise among emerging tenure track assistant faculty.
RCTE PhD student Beth Leahy received an SBSRI Dissertation Grant which will fund archival research trips to New Mexico and Arizona this spring.
Nina Boutsikaris' piece "The Tuesday Evening Train" will appear in The Los Angeles Review Fall 2015 (issue 18.)
Thu, 04/16/2015 (All day)
Arizona Quarterly 27th Annual Symposium
 
Thursday April 16, 2015
1:30 p.m.
Dale M. Bauer
Professor, Illinois
“On Women’s Serial Fiction”
 
3:30 p.m.
Leerom Medovoi
Professor, Arizona
“Periodizing the Postmodern, Texualizing the World System”
 
Friday April 17, 2015
10 a.m.
Justus Nieland
Professor, Michigan State
“Management Cinema: Film, Design, and...

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Bookshelf

Zines in Third Space: Radical Cooperation and Borderlands Rhetoric by Adela C. Licona

Zines in Third Space develops third-space theory with a practical engagement in the subcultural space of zines as alternative media produced specifically by feminists and queers of color. Adela C. Licona explores how borderlands rhetorics function in feminist and queer of-color zines to challenge dominant knowledges as well as normativitizing mis/representations, Licona characterizes these as zines as thrid-space sites of borderlands rhetorics revealing dissident performances,...

Rhetorics of the Americas: 3114 BCE to 2012 CE by Damian Baca

This is the first work to begin to fill a gap: an understanding of discourse aimed to persuade within the Pre-Columbian Americas. The contributors in this collection offer glimpses of what those Indigenous rhetorics might have looked like and how their influences remain. The reader is invited to recognize “the invention of the Americas,” providing other ways to contemplate material life prior to contemporary capitalism, telling us about the global from long ago to current global capitalism....

Game Work: Language, Power, and Computer Game Culture by Ken S. McAllister

As the popularity of computer games has exploded over the past decade, both scholars and game industry professionals have recognized the necessity of treating games less as frivolous entertainment and more as artifacts of culture worthy of political, social, economic, rhetorical, and aesthetic analysis. Ken McAllister notes in his introduction to Game Work that, even though games are essentially impractical, they are nevertheless important mediating agents for the broad exercise of socio-...

Ground|Water. The Art, Design and Science of a Dry River

Ellen McMahon, Ander Monson, Beth Weinstein Eds.

Ground|Water is an ode to a dry river, the kind of river most familiar to those who dwell in Southern Arizona. It is also an experiment in making something beautiful from something that has been desecrated. And it is a strong message about community and responsibility.

What You See in the Dark by Manuel Muñoz

“You’ll understand one day, her mother had said at the bus station. When you find a man of your own, you’ll know why you’ll run toward him.”
A penetrating look at people searching for meaning and authenticity in lives played out under watchful eyes, this thoroughly original work is intense and fascinating in its juxtapositions of tenderness and menace, violence and regret, and its atmosphere recreation of a place on a brink of change.

History Lesson for Girls by Aurelie Sheehan

In her follow-up to the critically acclaimed novel The Anxiety of Everyday Objects, Aurelie Sheehan presents a moving coming-of-age story set in the disturbingly reckless and often hilariously tacky 1970s. In 1975, Alison Glass, age thirteen, moves to Connecticut with her bohemian parents and her horse, Jazz. Shy, observant, and in a back brace for scoliosis, Alison finds strength in an unlikely friendship with Kate Hamilton, the charismatic but troubled daughter of an egomaniacal New Age guru...

The Colors of Nature by Alison Deming

The Colors of Nature: Culture, Identity, and the Natural World is an anthology that doesn’t operate merely as a collection of essays and poems by writers of color and their reflections about the natural world. Rather, the anthology is a sophisticated argument expertly structured around the following question: “Why is there so little ‘nature writing’ by people of color?”—Oliver de la Paz

Mestiz@ Scripts, Digital Migrations, and the Territories of Writing by Damian Baca

 

Conventional scholarship on written communication positions the Western alphabet as a precondition for literacy. Thus, pictographic, non-verbal writing practices of Mesoamerica remain obscured by representations of lettered speech. This book examines how contemporary Mestiz@ scripts challenge alphabetic dominance, thereby undermining the colonized territories of "writing." Strategic weavings of Aztec and European inscription systems not only promote historically-grounded accounts of how...

The Cambridge Companion to the Modern Gothic by Jerrold Hogle

This Companion explores the many ways in which the Gothic has dispersed in the twentieth and twenty-first centuries, and in particular how it has come to offer a focus for the tensions inherent in modernity.  Fourteen essays by world-class experts show how the gothic in numerous forms - including literature, film, television, and cyberspace -- helps audiences both to distance themselves from and to deal with some of the key underlying problems of modern life.  Topics discussed include...
Manuel Muñoz's dazzling second collection finds the author returning, once again, to the small towns of California's Central Valley. Set in a neighborhood with characters whose lives often intersect with each other, The Faith Healer of Olive Avenue offers ten stories about a wide range of lives: a mother coping with a mortally injured son after his motorcycle accident; a single father returning from San Francisco and attempting a reconciliation with an estranged sister; a young woman...