News & Events

 RCTE PhD Alum (1999) Julie Jung won Illinois State University's Outstanding University Teacher award.
MFA student Jon Riccio's poem "Shoulder Dancing" was published in the most recent issue of Triggerfish Critical Review.  
MFA student Jon Riccio two pieces up at Mountain Gazette: "The Kerosene Arts" and "Full Disclosure."    
MFA student Nina Boutsikaris was named a finalist in the Tucson Festival of Books Literary Awards!
Sun, 03/01/2015 - 4:30pm
Please join us as we read D.H. Lawrence this Sunday afternoon at the next Literature, Poetics and Performance Workshop. We're shaking things up this year and trying out various social spots near campus where we can read, drink, and make merry! Details below. Hope to see you there!
What: D.H. Lawrence
When: Sunday, March 1st, 4:30pm
Where: Pasco on University Ave
Who: Anyone who wants to come and...
Thu, 04/16/2015 (All day)
Arizona Quarterly 27th Annual Symposium
 
Thursday April 16, 2015
1:30 p.m.
Dale M. Bauer
Professor, Illinois
“On Women’s Serial Fiction”
 
3:30 p.m.
Leerom Medovoi
Professor, Arizona
“Periodizing the Postmodern, Texualizing the World System”
 
Friday April 17, 2015
10 a.m.
Justus Nieland
Professor, Michigan State
“Management Cinema: Film, Design, and...

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Feb 13 2015 - 4:00pm to 5:00pm
 
 
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Bookshelf

Horse, Flower, Bird by Kate Bernheimer

In Kate Bernheimer’s familiar and spare, yet wondrous world, an exotic dancer builds her own cage, a wife tends a secret basement menagerie, a fishmonger’s daughter befriends a tulip bulb, and sisters explore cycles of love and violence by reenacting scenes from Star Wars. Enthralling, subtle, and poetic, this collection evokes the age-old pleasures of classic fairy tales and makes them new.
Horse, Flower, Bird includes 8 black and white illustrations.
“Once upon a time, there was a...

The Computer Culture Reader. Judd Ethan Ruggill, Ken S. McAllister, and Joseph R. Chaney, eds.

The Computer Culture Reader brings together a multi-disciplinary group of scholars to probe the underlying structures and overarching implications of the ways in which people and computers collaborate in the production of meaning. The contributors navigate the heady and sometimes terrifying atmosphere surrounding the digital revolution in an attempt to take its measure through examinations of community and modes of communication, representation, information-production, learning, work, and play...

Crossing the River by Fenton Johnson

THE IDEA PULSED WITH ROMANCE, BUT THE ACT WAS RASH, RECKLESS – AND IRREVOCABLE.
Carrying her Confederate heritage like a flag, Martha Bragg Pickett was as stubborn as her red hair. And hungry for life. On a dare she crossed the river, leaving the safe, abstaining, Baptist, Southern side and venturing over to the dangerous, rowdy, Catholic Northern side. And when that proved less than thrilling, she marched her young self right into the (men only) Miracle Inn, which got a rise...

How a Mother Weaned Her Girl from Fairy Tales: and Other Stories by Kate Bernheimer




Elegant and brutal, the stories in Kate Bernheimer's latest collection occupy a heightened landscape, where the familiar cedes to the grotesque and nonsense just as often devolves into terror. These are fairy tales out of time, renewing classic stories we think we know, like one of Bernheimer's girls, whose hands of steel turn to flowers, leaving her beautiful but alone.
Kate Bernheimer is the author of the short story collection Horse, Flower, Bird and the editor of My Mother She Killed Me...

My Mother She Killed Me, My Father He ate Me: Forty New Fairy Tales edited by Kate Bernheimer

Props? Already on the ready. The slipper, the spindle, the seashell, the sword. The coach, the comb, the cauldron, the cape. The apple, the bread, and the porridge. And look, even simpler things in the dusty shadows, from earier iterations of these tales. The feather, the stone, the bucket of water; the knife, the bone, the bucket of blood. —from the foreword by Gregory Maguire
Contributors to this anthology include Kim Addonizio, Neil Gaiman, Hiromi Itō, Ilya Kaminsky, Jonathan Keats, Lydia...

A Palace of Pearls by Jane Miller

In this book-length sequence, animated by a confrontation with her dead father, Jane Miller meditates on home, love, war and the responsibility of the poet. A Palace of Pearls is inspired by one of the most spectacular civilizations in history, the Arab kingdom of Al-Andalus—a Middle Age civilization where architecture, science and art flourished and Christians, Jews, and Muslims lived in relative harmony. The reader roams through "rooms," encountering Greek, Judaic, and Roman mythology, and...

Jack Kerouac is Pregnant: Stories by Aurelie Sheehan

Excerpt from “Jack Kerouac Is Pregnant”
How to Be a Passenger on a Motorcycle

The motorcycle owner gets on the bike. He’s stomped on the clutch or whatever that thing is, the choke maybe. He dons his big helmet, puts on his big black gloves, lifts his leg over the hulking machine. He situates himself on the seat, revs, adjusts the mirror, and looks at you, standing on the sidewalk like an orphan. You take the cue. You tentatively put on your helmet, a white one unlike his black one, and you’...
Jewelry Box by Aurelie Sheehan

 

The sixty-eight short works in this collection (some only a paragraph, others a few pages) straddle memoir and fiction, exploring the nuances of sexuality, motherhood, love, and ambition. Like Lydia Davis, Aurelie Sheehan's stories are potent miniatures that blossom out from seemingly insignificant encounters and objects. Jewelry Box is a collection of intimate renderings of the life that surrounds us, just under the surface.
Aurelie Sheehan is author of two novels, History Lesson for Girls and...

Rhetorics of the Americas: 3114 BCE to 2012 CE by Damian Baca

This is the first work to begin to fill a gap: an understanding of discourse aimed to persuade within the Pre-Columbian Americas. The contributors in this collection offer glimpses of what those Indigenous rhetorics might have looked like and how their influences remain. The reader is invited to recognize “the invention of the Americas,” providing other ways to contemplate material life prior to contemporary capitalism, telling us about the global from long ago to current global capitalism....

Mestiz@ Scripts, Digital Migrations, and the Territories of Writing by Damian Baca

 

Conventional scholarship on written communication positions the Western alphabet as a precondition for literacy. Thus, pictographic, non-verbal writing practices of Mesoamerica remain obscured by representations of lettered speech. This book examines how contemporary Mestiz@ scripts challenge alphabetic dominance, thereby undermining the colonized territories of "writing." Strategic weavings of Aztec and European inscription systems not only promote historically-grounded accounts of how...