News & Events

Jessica Wilson (MFA Alum 2009) "The Language of Fathers" received an Honorable Mention from Glimmer Train in the Spring 2014 "Family Matters" contest.
Susan Briante and Farid Matuk have a terrific think piece in Boston Review      
MFA Student Ingrid Wenzler's short story "A Replacement" has been accepted for publication in the December issue of Cleaver Magazine.
Jarrett Eakins's short story, Barge of Trees, is soon to appear in the forthcoming Enizagam Vol 8.
Fri, 10/03/2014 - 12:00pm
1. Professor Maha Nassar, School of Middle Eastern and North African Studies 

Complicated Heroes: Palestinians in Israel and the 1967 Arab Defeat

 

As they sought to comprehend their overwhelming defeat in the 1967 (Six-Day) War with Israel, Arab intellectuals turned to Palestinian citizens of Israel for answers. In particular they lionized the Palestinian “resistance poets,” such as...
Mon, 10/06/2014 - 9:00am
The English Department is a co-sponsor of the upcoming symposium: Digital Literacies In and Beyond the L2 Classroom: A Hybrid Symposium on Research and Practice. Digital poster sessions will be online the week of October 6 - 11, and on October 11 there will be a discussion panel and a keynote on campus. The Symposium is co-directed by ELL Program Director and Associate Professor Jonathon...
Fri, 11/07/2014 - 12:00pm
1. Professor Sonia Shiri, School of Middle Eastern and North African Studies
Revolution in Tunisia: Protest Signs, Graffiti and Facebook
 
2. Professor Fenton Johnson, Dept. of English
Power and Obedience:  Restoring Pacifism to American Politics
Throughout American history, pacifism, though never a majority sentiment, has played a role in shaping national perspectives on war and peace.  But as...

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Digital Literacies Symposium Oct 6 2014 - 9:00am to Oct 11 2014 - 6:00pm
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
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Bookshelf

A Palace of Pearls by Jane Miller

In this book-length sequence, animated by a confrontation with her dead father, Jane Miller meditates on home, love, war and the responsibility of the poet. A Palace of Pearls is inspired by one of the most spectacular civilizations in history, the Arab kingdom of Al-Andalus—a Middle Age civilization where architecture, science and art flourished and Christians, Jews, and Muslims lived in relative harmony. The reader roams through "rooms," encountering Greek, Judaic, and Roman mythology, and...

Game Work: Language, Power, and Computer Game Culture by Ken S. McAllister

As the popularity of computer games has exploded over the past decade, both scholars and game industry professionals have recognized the necessity of treating games less as frivolous entertainment and more as artifacts of culture worthy of political, social, economic, rhetorical, and aesthetic analysis. Ken McAllister notes in his introduction to Game Work that, even though games are essentially impractical, they are nevertheless important mediating agents for the broad exercise of socio-...

Swamp Isthmus by Joshua Marie Wilkinson

Swamp Isthmus takes the stripped, lyric voice of Selenography, the first book of Wilkinson’s No Volta pentalogy, and confronts a pre-apocalyptic vision of American urban life. Here, the city and forest are one, as are the river and sewer. The ghost and the body are one, and the buildings and the trees, the sidewalks and the switchbacks all fuse. The poems in Swamp Isthmus create the flipside of the pastoral—the urban returns to the rural, their fates...
Jewelry Box by Aurelie Sheehan

 

The sixty-eight short works in this collection (some only a paragraph, others a few pages) straddle memoir and fiction, exploring the nuances of sexuality, motherhood, love, and ambition. Like Lydia Davis, Aurelie Sheehan's stories are potent miniatures that blossom out from seemingly insignificant encounters and objects. Jewelry Box is a collection of intimate renderings of the life that surrounds us, just under the surface.
Aurelie Sheehan is author of two novels, History Lesson for Girls and...

Out of Bounds by Matthew Abraham

Academic freedom is a key element of the academic enterprise in the U.S. However, it does not seem to exist when scholars seek to advocate on behalf of Palestinian self-determination.
This unique work examines how the knowledge-power nexus is shaping the discourse around the Israel-Palestine conflict and restricting academic freedom. Beginning with a discussion of American Zionism, the work proceeds to explain why scholars working on the question of Palestine are often denied standard academic...
Manuel Muñoz's dazzling second collection finds the author returning, once again, to the small towns of California's Central Valley. Set in a neighborhood with characters whose lives often intersect with each other, The Faith Healer of Olive Avenue offers ten stories about a wide range of lives: a mother coping with a mortally injured son after his motorcycle accident; a single father returning from San Francisco and attempting a reconciliation with an estranged sister; a young woman...

Horse, Flower, Bird by Kate Bernheimer

In Kate Bernheimer’s familiar and spare, yet wondrous world, an exotic dancer builds her own cage, a wife tends a secret basement menagerie, a fishmonger’s daughter befriends a tulip bulb, and sisters explore cycles of love and violence by reenacting scenes from Star Wars. Enthralling, subtle, and poetic, this collection evokes the age-old pleasures of classic fairy tales and makes them new.
Horse, Flower, Bird includes 8 black and white illustrations.
“Once upon a time, there was a...

History Lesson for Girls by Aurelie Sheehan

In her follow-up to the critically acclaimed novel The Anxiety of Everyday Objects, Aurelie Sheehan presents a moving coming-of-age story set in the disturbingly reckless and often hilariously tacky 1970s. In 1975, Alison Glass, age thirteen, moves to Connecticut with her bohemian parents and her horse, Jazz. Shy, observant, and in a back brace for scoliosis, Alison finds strength in an unlikely friendship with Kate Hamilton, the charismatic but troubled daughter of an egomaniacal New Age guru...

AZ 100 Indie Films: A State of Arizona Centennial Celebration by Judd Ethan Ruggill, Ken S. McAllister

A catalog of the 100 films selected by the Arizona Media Arts Center to celebrate the 2012 Centennial of Arizona statehood. Includes copious film and filmmaker information, a guide to film themes for teachers and scholars, and a still from each film. Black & White with Color cover. 200 pages.

My Mother She Killed Me, My Father He ate Me: Forty New Fairy Tales edited by Kate Bernheimer

Props? Already on the ready. The slipper, the spindle, the seashell, the sword. The coach, the comb, the cauldron, the cape. The apple, the bread, and the porridge. And look, even simpler things in the dusty shadows, from earier iterations of these tales. The feather, the stone, the bucket of water; the knife, the bone, the bucket of blood. —from the foreword by Gregory Maguire
Contributors to this anthology include Kim Addonizio, Neil Gaiman, Hiromi Itō, Ilya Kaminsky, Jonathan Keats, Lydia...