News & Events

Jon Riccio's (MFA 2015) poem "Eyelashes" was published in the 4th issue of Plenitude.    
Cristina Ramírez was just recently elected to serve on the National Board of Coalition of Women Scholars in the History of Rhetoric and Composition.
Cristina Ramírez received the 2014 CCCC's Research Initiative Grant with Jessica Enoch "Mestiza Rhetors: An Anthology of Latina Rhetorical Activism in North America, 1880-1920."  This was the first historiography grant to have been awarded.
Megan Kimble, MFA 2013, has a piece in the April 13 op-ed pages of the Sunday LA Times.  
Fri, 04/18/2014 - 4:00pm
Emily Lyons, "Alice’s Adventures Under Glass: Photography, Science, and Lewis Carroll’s Alice Books"
 
The topsy-turvy worlds of Wonderland and Looking-Glass land, in which rabbits talk and wear pocket watches, human babies morph into pigs, and gnats the size of chickens “rejoice” in classifying other insects, emerge out of a climate of anxious reexamination, post Darwin, of the...

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The 26th Annual Arizona Quarterly Symposium Apr 3 2014 (All day) to Apr 5 2014 (All day)
 
 
 
 
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Apr 8 2014 - 4:00pm to 5:00pm
 
 
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Bookshelf

Keeping Faith by Fenton Johnson

WINNER OF A LAMBDA LITERARY AWARD AND A KENTUCKY LITERARY AWARD
In a resonant account of his spiritual quest, Fenton Johnson examines what it means for a skeptic to have and to keep faith. Exploring Western and Eastern monastic traditions, Johnson lives as a member of the community at the Trappist Abbey of Gethsemani in Kentucky and the branches of the San Francisco Zen Center. Ultimately his encounter with Buddhism brings him to a new understanding and embrace of Christianity. Weaving together...

Ground|Water. The Art, Design and Science of a Dry River

Ellen McMahon, Ander Monson, Beth Weinstein Eds.

Ground|Water is an ode to a dry river, the kind of river most familiar to those who dwell in Southern Arizona. It is also an experiment in making something beautiful from something that has been desecrated. And it is a strong message about community and responsibility.

Carter Clay: A Novel by Elizabeth Evans

Drunk, and driving a van down a Florida highway, Carter Clay, a Vietnam vet at loose ends, irrevocably shatters the lives of the Altiz family, killing Joe and seriously injuring his wife, Katherine, and their daughter, Jersey, in a hit-and-run accident. Horrified, Clay seeks redemption, while still concealing his culpability, by becoming the questionable caretaker of the two survivors' damaged lives--eventually imposing upon them the baggage of his past and his haphazard faith in God....

The Computer Culture Reader. Judd Ethan Ruggill, Ken S. McAllister, and Joseph R. Chaney, eds.

The Computer Culture Reader brings together a multi-disciplinary group of scholars to probe the underlying structures and overarching implications of the ways in which people and computers collaborate in the production of meaning. The contributors navigate the heady and sometimes terrifying atmosphere surrounding the digital revolution in an attempt to take its measure through examinations of community and modes of communication, representation, information-production, learning, work, and play...

Hope is the Thing with Feathers by Chris Cokinos

A prizewinning poet and nature writer weaves together natural history, biology, sociology, and personal narrative to tell the story of the lives, habitats, and deaths of six extinct bird species.
 
“This story – of the ghost species still haunting this continent – is full of power and mystery.”

Bill McKibben, author of The End of Nature
“I was mesmerized by this fine book and felt in reading these lost natural histories as if I had both been given a gift and had one taken away.”...

Rhetorics of the Americas: 3114 BCE to 2012 CE by Damian Baca

This is the first work to begin to fill a gap: an understanding of discourse aimed to persuade within the Pre-Columbian Americas. The contributors in this collection offer glimpses of what those Indigenous rhetorics might have looked like and how their influences remain. The reader is invited to recognize “the invention of the Americas,” providing other ways to contemplate material life prior to contemporary capitalism, telling us about the global from long ago to current global capitalism....

The Making of Barack Obama: The Politics of Persuasion by Matthew Abraham

 “From the inspiring slogans and speeches of his campaign to the eloquent successes and failures of his presidency, Barack Obama has been extravagantly praised and sarcastically criticized for the distinctive power of his rhetoric. The essays in this collection persuasively analyze that rhetoric in all its specific tactics and general strategies, in its idealist yearnings and its pragmatic compromises, in its ambitious strivings and its political obstacles.”
President’s Professor of...

Swamp Isthmus by Joshua Marie Wilkinson

Swamp Isthmus takes the stripped, lyric voice of Selenography, the first book of Wilkinson’s No Volta pentalogy, and confronts a pre-apocalyptic vision of American urban life. Here, the city and forest are one, as are the river and sewer. The ghost and the body are one, and the buildings and the trees, the sidewalks and the switchbacks all fuse. The poems in Swamp Isthmus create the flipside of the pastoral—the urban returns to the rural, their fates...

A Palace of Pearls by Jane Miller

In this book-length sequence, animated by a confrontation with her dead father, Jane Miller meditates on home, love, war and the responsibility of the poet. A Palace of Pearls is inspired by one of the most spectacular civilizations in history, the Arab kingdom of Al-Andalus—a Middle Age civilization where architecture, science and art flourished and Christians, Jews, and Muslims lived in relative harmony. The reader roams through "rooms," encountering Greek, Judaic, and Roman mythology, and...

My Mother She Killed Me, My Father He ate Me: Forty New Fairy Tales edited by Kate Bernheimer

Props? Already on the ready. The slipper, the spindle, the seashell, the sword. The coach, the comb, the cauldron, the cape. The apple, the bread, and the porridge. And look, even simpler things in the dusty shadows, from earier iterations of these tales. The feather, the stone, the bucket of water; the knife, the bone, the bucket of blood. —from the foreword by Gregory Maguire
Contributors to this anthology include Kim Addonizio, Neil Gaiman, Hiromi Itō, Ilya Kaminsky, Jonathan Keats, Lydia...