News & Events

Michelle Denham was awarded one of the $2,500 Writing Program Fellowships.  Maggie Happe was awarded the Johnnie Raye Harper Teaching Award of $200. Emma Miller was awarded the Barry Briggs Teaching Award of $200. Emily Palese was nominated for the Johnnie Raye Harper Teaching Award. Tesica Starkey was nominated for theJohnnie Raye Harper Teaching Award. Madison Bertenshaw was nominated tor the...
MFA Associate Professor Susan Briante was highlighted in the Association of Writers and Writing Programs (AWP) Spotlight.
                  RCTE Graduate Student Daniel Bernal was nominated for the Johnny Raye Harper Award RCTE Graduate Student Dr. Rosanne Carlo together with Barbara MacDonald received the Wildcat Writers Service Learning Award RCTE Graduate Student Catherine Chaterdon received the Julie Christakis DeFazio Award RCTE Graduate Student Dr. Tom Do received the Tilly Warnock Fellowship Award RCTE...
MFA student Janet Towle’s story, "Lodestone and Weathervane," is forthcoming in 'The Normal School' this fall.

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Bookshelf

SCISSORS, PAPER, ROCK by Fenton Johnson

“SCISSORS, PAPER, ROCK is a book of insight and honest love; it has the lyricism of family legend, and the dead-on truthful ring of a report from the trenches. Fenton Johnson has made something wonderful here.”

Barbara Kingsolver, author of Pigs in Heaven
 
“The emotional power of SCISSORS, PAPER, ROCK resides on a plot of land in Kentucky…, [It] chronicles the courtships, the births, the deaths and the agonizing disappointments of two generations of the Hardins of Strang Knob…When we first...

Game Work: Language, Power, and Computer Game Culture by Ken S. McAllister

As the popularity of computer games has exploded over the past decade, both scholars and game industry professionals have recognized the necessity of treating games less as frivolous entertainment and more as artifacts of culture worthy of political, social, economic, rhetorical, and aesthetic analysis. Ken McAllister notes in his introduction to Game Work that, even though games are essentially impractical, they are nevertheless important mediating agents for the broad exercise of socio-...
Fifty leading writers retell myths from around the world in this dazzling follow-up to the bestselling My Mother She Killed Me, My Father He Ate Me.
Icarus flies once more. Aztec jaguar gods again stalk the earth. An American soldier designs a new kind of Trojan horse—his cremains in a bullet. Here, in beguiling guise, are your favorite mythological figures alongside characters from Indian, Punjabi, Inuit, and other traditions.
 Aimee Bender retells the myth of the Titans.
 Madeline Miller...

The Colors of Nature by Alison Deming

The Colors of Nature: Culture, Identity, and the Natural World is an anthology that doesn’t operate merely as a collection of essays and poems by writers of color and their reflections about the natural world. Rather, the anthology is a sophisticated argument expertly structured around the following question: “Why is there so little ‘nature writing’ by people of color?”—Oliver de la Paz

Crossing the River by Fenton Johnson

THE IDEA PULSED WITH ROMANCE, BUT THE ACT WAS RASH, RECKLESS – AND IRREVOCABLE.
Carrying her Confederate heritage like a flag, Martha Bragg Pickett was as stubborn as her red hair. And hungry for life. On a dare she crossed the river, leaving the safe, abstaining, Baptist, Southern side and venturing over to the dangerous, rowdy, Catholic Northern side. And when that proved less than thrilling, she marched her young self right into the (men only) Miracle Inn, which got a rise...

Out of Bounds by Matthew Abraham

Academic freedom is a key element of the academic enterprise in the U.S. However, it does not seem to exist when scholars seek to advocate on behalf of Palestinian self-determination.
This unique work examines how the knowledge-power nexus is shaping the discourse around the Israel-Palestine conflict and restricting academic freedom. Beginning with a discussion of American Zionism, the work proceeds to explain why scholars working on the question of Palestine are often denied standard academic...

Hemingway and the Black Renaissance ed. by Charles Scruggs and Edward Holcomb

Noted scholars [Holcomb and Scruggs] provide a solid framework for the study of the connections between Hemingway's writing and the literary works of black writers. The collection's unity relies on defining the "Black Renaissance" as encompassing not only the Harlem Renaissance but also the subsequent advances in black literature sustained through and beyond the war years, the Black Arts period, and "into the present transnational phase."—Choice Review

Language at Play: Digital Games in Second and Foreign Language Teaching and Learning by Julie M. Sykes and Jonathon Reinhardt

The potential of digital games to inform, enhance, and transform second and foreign language (L2) learning is enormous, but harnessing their potential for application in the L2 classroom presents complex challenges. In Language at Play: Digital Games in Second and Foreign Language Teaching and Learning, Sykes and Reinhardt combine research from a variety of perspectives in applied linguistics, educational gaming, and games studies, and structure their discussion of five major concepts...

AZ 100 Indie Films: A State of Arizona Centennial Celebration by Judd Ethan Ruggill, Ken S. McAllister

A catalog of the 100 films selected by the Arizona Media Arts Center to celebrate the 2012 Centennial of Arizona statehood. Includes copious film and filmmaker information, a guide to film themes for teachers and scholars, and a still from each film. Black & White with Color cover. 200 pages.

The Computer Culture Reader. Judd Ethan Ruggill, Ken S. McAllister, and Joseph R. Chaney, eds.

The Computer Culture Reader brings together a multi-disciplinary group of scholars to probe the underlying structures and overarching implications of the ways in which people and computers collaborate in the production of meaning. The contributors navigate the heady and sometimes terrifying atmosphere surrounding the digital revolution in an attempt to take its measure through examinations of community and modes of communication, representation, information-production, learning, work, and play...