News & Events

Erin Zwiener has an op-ed up at VIDA: Women in Literary Arts. She also has an essay, "Preconditions for Diplomacy" up at The Toast.
Kati Standefer's interview with MFA alum Rafael de Grenade--titled "Forgetting We Live In the Desert: Rafael de Grenade on tough landscapes, writing as inquiry, and innovating in the face of climate change"-- is now out in the September 15 issue of the High Country News.
 Three poems of MFA student Jon Riccio's, "Gainful," "Dear Identity Thief," and "Logo to Market" appeared in  CutBank.
A well-deserved recognition of Ken McAllister, in this welcome by President Hart! ... an increasing number of UA employees are engaged in the digital humanities movement, one that encourages the expansion and use of technologies like geo-tagging, informatics and augmented realities to enhance student learning and cross-discipline engagement. Advocates include: UA English professor Ken...
Fri, 09/19/2014 - 4:00pm
"The Peter Panimal: Devolution and Perfected Existence in J. M. Barrie's Peter Pan"

Emma Miller proposes that J. M. Barrie uses Peter Pan to engage and challenge humanist discourse about the potential progress and perfection of the human species. Whereas many 19th century projections of the perfected or ideal human depended on processes of refinement, further progress, and a wider...
Mon, 09/22/2014 - 12:00pm
About Dr. Faisal Devji, St Antony's College
Fri, 10/03/2014 - 12:00pm
1. Professor Maha Nassar, School of Middle Eastern and North African Studies 

Complicated Heroes: Palestinians in Israel and the 1967 Arab Defeat

 

As they sought to comprehend their overwhelming defeat in the 1967 (Six-Day) War with Israel, Arab intellectuals turned to Palestinian citizens of Israel for answers. In particular they lionized the Palestinian “resistance poets,” such as...

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Bookshelf

Gaming Matters: Art, Science, and Magic and the Computer Game Medium by Judd Ethan Ruggill and Ken S. McAllister

In Gaming Matters, Judd Ethan Ruggill and Ken S. McAllister offer a playful and provocative look at the computer game medium, arguing that games are:

Idiosyncratic, and thus difficult to apprehend using the traditional tools of media study

Irreconcilable, or complex to such a degree that developers, players, and scholars have contradictory ways of describing them

Boring, and therefore obligated to constantly make demands

on players' attention

Anachronistic, or built on age-old...
Fifty leading writers retell myths from around the world in this dazzling follow-up to the bestselling My Mother She Killed Me, My Father He Ate Me.
Icarus flies once more. Aztec jaguar gods again stalk the earth. An American soldier designs a new kind of Trojan horse—his cremains in a bullet. Here, in beguiling guise, are your favorite mythological figures alongside characters from Indian, Punjabi, Inuit, and other traditions.
 Aimee Bender retells the myth of the Titans.
 Madeline Miller...
Manuel Muñoz’s stories move beyond traditional themes of Chicano literature to explore conflicts of family, memory, longing, and loss. In the lonely rural towns of California’s Central Valley, his characters struggle to maintain hope and independence in the face of isolation. In the title story, a teenager learns the consequences of succumbing to the lure of a stranger; in another, a young farmworker attempts to hide his supervision of a huddle of children from the police. Bighearted and...

The Making of Barack Obama: The Politics of Persuasion by Matthew Abraham

 “From the inspiring slogans and speeches of his campaign to the eloquent successes and failures of his presidency, Barack Obama has been extravagantly praised and sarcastically criticized for the distinctive power of his rhetoric. The essays in this collection persuasively analyze that rhetoric in all its specific tactics and general strategies, in its idealist yearnings and its pragmatic compromises, in its ambitious strivings and its political obstacles.”
President’s Professor of...

The Anxiety of Everyday Objects by Aurelie Sheehan

Excerpt from Chapter One

All good secretaries will eventually find truth in the hearts of men.
Winona Bartlett, Win to her friends, might not have been the world’s best secretary, but her nature was such that serving, subservience, and coffee service came easily, and, in fact, she felt there was an inherent good in doing things well, and this determination more than equaled her actual interest in the long-term prospects at Grecko Mauster Crill. She practiced her secretarial role as a Zen...

Horse, Flower, Bird by Kate Bernheimer

In Kate Bernheimer’s familiar and spare, yet wondrous world, an exotic dancer builds her own cage, a wife tends a secret basement menagerie, a fishmonger’s daughter befriends a tulip bulb, and sisters explore cycles of love and violence by reenacting scenes from Star Wars. Enthralling, subtle, and poetic, this collection evokes the age-old pleasures of classic fairy tales and makes them new.
Horse, Flower, Bird includes 8 black and white illustrations.
“Once upon a time, there was a...

Swamp Isthmus by Joshua Marie Wilkinson

Swamp Isthmus takes the stripped, lyric voice of Selenography, the first book of Wilkinson’s No Volta pentalogy, and confronts a pre-apocalyptic vision of American urban life. Here, the city and forest are one, as are the river and sewer. The ghost and the body are one, and the buildings and the trees, the sidewalks and the switchbacks all fuse. The poems in Swamp Isthmus create the flipside of the pastoral—the urban returns to the rural, their fates...

Approaches to Teaching Faulkner's As I Lay Dying edited by Lynda Zwinger and Patrick O'Donnell

As I Lay Dying is considered by many both the most enigmatic and the most accessible of Faulkner's major works. This volume of essays, with contributions by Cedric Gael Bryant, Barbara Ladd, John T. Matthews, Homer B. Pettey, and others provides "an aid that should help both new teachers and veterans to teach [As I Lay Dying] more fully and effectively."—Gail L. Mortimer

Keeping Faith by Fenton Johnson

WINNER OF A LAMBDA LITERARY AWARD AND A KENTUCKY LITERARY AWARD
In a resonant account of his spiritual quest, Fenton Johnson examines what it means for a skeptic to have and to keep faith. Exploring Western and Eastern monastic traditions, Johnson lives as a member of the community at the Trappist Abbey of Gethsemani in Kentucky and the branches of the San Francisco Zen Center. Ultimately his encounter with Buddhism brings him to a new understanding and embrace of Christianity. Weaving together...

Hemingway and the Black Renaissance ed. by Charles Scruggs and Edward Holcomb

Noted scholars [Holcomb and Scruggs] provide a solid framework for the study of the connections between Hemingway's writing and the literary works of black writers. The collection's unity relies on defining the "Black Renaissance" as encompassing not only the Harlem Renaissance but also teh subsequent advances in black literature sustaned through and beyond the war years, the Black Arts period, and "into the present transnational phase."—Choice Review