News & Events

MFA student Jan Bindas-Tenney's essay "Paper Mill is Something Not Heard" will appear in Issue 30, Spring 2015 of Arts & Letters. She also  received an honorable mention in the AWP Intro Journals Award for her essay "No-See-Ums"!
RCTE Assistant Professor Cristina D. Ramírez was awarded the Provost Author Support for her forthcoming book, Occupying Our Space: The Rhetoric of Mexican Women Journalists and Activists, 1875-1942.  These funds support publications of high scholarly promise among emerging tenure track assistant faculty.
RCTE PhD student Beth Leahy received an SBSRI Dissertation Grant which will fund archival research trips to New Mexico and Arizona this spring.
Nina Boutsikaris' piece "The Tuesday Evening Train" will appear in The Los Angeles Review Fall 2015 (issue 18.)
Thu, 04/16/2015 (All day)
Arizona Quarterly 27th Annual Symposium
 
Thursday April 16, 2015
1:30 p.m.
Dale M. Bauer
Professor, Illinois
“On Women’s Serial Fiction”
 
3:30 p.m.
Leerom Medovoi
Professor, Arizona
“Periodizing the Postmodern, Texualizing the World System”
 
Friday April 17, 2015
10 a.m.
Justus Nieland
Professor, Michigan State
“Management Cinema: Film, Design, and...

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Bookshelf

Gaming Matters: Art, Science, and Magic and the Computer Game Medium by Judd Ethan Ruggill and Ken S. McAllister

In Gaming Matters, Judd Ethan Ruggill and Ken S. McAllister offer a playful and provocative look at the computer game medium, arguing that games are:

Idiosyncratic, and thus difficult to apprehend using the traditional tools of media study

Irreconcilable, or complex to such a degree that developers, players, and scholars have contradictory ways of describing them

Boring, and therefore obligated to constantly make demands

on players' attention

Anachronistic, or built on age-old...

The Making of Barack Obama: The Politics of Persuasion by Matthew Abraham

 “From the inspiring slogans and speeches of his campaign to the eloquent successes and failures of his presidency, Barack Obama has been extravagantly praised and sarcastically criticized for the distinctive power of his rhetoric. The essays in this collection persuasively analyze that rhetoric in all its specific tactics and general strategies, in its idealist yearnings and its pragmatic compromises, in its ambitious strivings and its political obstacles.”
President’s Professor of...

Hemingway and the Black Renaissance ed. by Charles Scruggs and Edward Holcomb

Noted scholars [Holcomb and Scruggs] provide a solid framework for the study of the connections between Hemingway's writing and the literary works of black writers. The collection's unity relies on defining the "Black Renaissance" as encompassing not only the Harlem Renaissance but also the subsequent advances in black literature sustained through and beyond the war years, the Black Arts period, and "into the present transnational phase."—Choice Review

Keeping Faith by Fenton Johnson

WINNER OF A LAMBDA LITERARY AWARD AND A KENTUCKY LITERARY AWARD
In a resonant account of his spiritual quest, Fenton Johnson examines what it means for a skeptic to have and to keep faith. Exploring Western and Eastern monastic traditions, Johnson lives as a member of the community at the Trappist Abbey of Gethsemani in Kentucky and the branches of the San Francisco Zen Center. Ultimately his encounter with Buddhism brings him to a new understanding and embrace of Christianity. Weaving together...

Genius Loci by Alison Deming

From a poet and essayist whose writing about nature has won her comparisons with Gary Snyder and Terry Tempest Williams comes a new collection that offers further evidence of her ability to trace the intersections of the human and nonhuman worlds. The title poem is a lyrical excavation of the city of Prague, where layers of history, culture and nature have accumulated to form “a genius loci”—a guardian spirit.
From Penguin.Com
 

Vanishing Point by Ander Monson

In contemporary America, land of tell-all memoirs and endless reality television, what kind of person denies the opportunity to present himself in his own voice, to lead with “I”? How many layers of a life can be peeled back before the self vanishes?
In this provocative, witty series of meditations, Ander Monson faces down the idea of the memoir, grappling with the lure of self-interest and self-presentation. While setting out to describe the experience of serving as head juror at the trial of...
Manuel Muñoz's dazzling second collection finds the author returning, once again, to the small towns of California's Central Valley. Set in a neighborhood with characters whose lives often intersect with each other, The Faith Healer of Olive Avenue offers ten stories about a wide range of lives: a mother coping with a mortally injured son after his motorcycle accident; a single father returning from San Francisco and attempting a reconciliation with an estranged sister; a young woman...

Not All Okies Are White by Geta LeSeur

The book details the lives of five women from rural, agricultural towns in Arizona who managed to become self-educated activists despite heavy oppression.  Selected as a "2000 Best Southwest Book".  See PBS Arizona Eight interview here.

Hope is the Thing with Feathers by Chris Cokinos

A prizewinning poet and nature writer weaves together natural history, biology, sociology, and personal narrative to tell the story of the lives, habitats, and deaths of six extinct bird species.
 
“This story – of the ghost species still haunting this continent – is full of power and mystery.”

Bill McKibben, author of The End of Nature
“I was mesmerized by this fine book and felt in reading these lost natural histories as if I had both been given a gift and had one taken away.”...

History Lesson for Girls by Aurelie Sheehan

In her follow-up to the critically acclaimed novel The Anxiety of Everyday Objects, Aurelie Sheehan presents a moving coming-of-age story set in the disturbingly reckless and often hilariously tacky 1970s. In 1975, Alison Glass, age thirteen, moves to Connecticut with her bohemian parents and her horse, Jazz. Shy, observant, and in a back brace for scoliosis, Alison finds strength in an unlikely friendship with Kate Hamilton, the charismatic but troubled daughter of an egomaniacal New Age guru...